Midnight Negroni

We've said it before, but Port just doesn't seem to get enough love when it comes to cocktails. To be called a Port (or sometimes Vinho do Porto), it must be produced in Portugal. Other wine produced in the style of port are available, but we choose to go with the real thing. 

It's a fortified wine, meaning the wine has had other alcohol added to it. In Portugal, they do this by adding a grape distillate called aguardente (similar to brandy) to the wine, which stops the fermentation by killing the yeast, leaving more residual sugars in the wine. Regardless of how it's made, even just a little Port can enhance a cocktail like this one. 

But we suggest using Port wisely. It's very flavorful and can overwhelm a cocktail if you use too much or pair it with subtle spirits. So we're reaching for a great (local!) gin, Abernathy Gin from TennSouth. It's a New American style, but still has enough botanical flavor to work perfectly in this cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Abernathy Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1 oz sweet vermouth
.5 oz Port (any kind will do)
strip of orange zest for garnish


method:

Add all spirits to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir until fully chilled and strain into a chilled rocks glass with fresh ice. Garnish with orange peel.