Singapore Sling

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Originally created in a bar in Singapore 100 years ago and one of the oldest cocktail recipes still popular today, the Sling was adopted into tiki culture early on by Trader Vic (a pioneer of tiki drinks in the US) in a section of his drink menu titled "Drinks I Have Gathered from the Four Corners of the Globe." This menu also included such notables at the Pimm's Cup and Pisco Punch. Like it's cousin the Mai Tai, the Singapore Sling is probably most often thought of as a sweet, red drink full of rum that you enjoy at the hibachi grill, rather than the complex, tart, slightly bitter gin based cocktail it actually is. If anything, the Singapore Sling stands as the least saccharine tiki drink popular today, with all sweetness imparted by juice and the booze itself.

The famed mixologist D.A. Embury once said that "Of all the recipes published for [this drink] I have never seen any two that were alike." This one is based on one of the commonly accepted "original" recipes, but made it a little more modern and easy to make at home.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Cocktail strainer
Hurricane-style glass

Ingredients:

1.5 oz london dry gin
.5 oz Benedictine
.5 oz Cherry Heering (or cherry brandy)
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz pineapple juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
club soda

Method:

Fill shaker with ice. Combine gin, Benedictine, Cherry Heering, lime juice, pineapple juice, and bitters. Shake vigorously. Fill hurricane glass with fresh ice and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with fresh fruit. 



Scorpion Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Now this is our idea of a drink! We've all had the ubiquitous Long Island Iced Tea before, (Just admit it. Its ok you were young...) and we have the Scorpion Bowl to thank. While most Tiki drinks were actually invented by a handful of guys in the United States, the Bowl is based on the idea of "communal drinks," which was a part of South Sea drinking custom. The Polynesians knew there was nothing quite like sharing a giant bowl of booze with their friends!

For this drink, you will need the vessel known as a scorpion bowl or tiki bowl. These are available in a range of options and prices. Other than buying online, you will probably have to keep your eyes peeled at flea markets or antique stores to find one. If you do find one grab it! They aren't all that common in the wild, but otherwise easy to buy with your trusty computer. Traditionally decorated with demons to guard your drink, they can also be found covered with palm trees, hula girls, and other South Pacific imagery. Another feature might be a volcano in the center of the bowl. Trust us, get the one with the volcano if you can, the added theatrics are well worth it. 

The easy association to make is between tiki drinks and rum, but actually a wide range of spirits are used to create these libations. Remember these cocktails were invented by Americans who had access to all sorts of ingredients. That is why you will find things like gin, cognac, sherry, and curaçao included. Our Scorpion Bowl recipe is actually quite easy to make, so invite a few friends and lets get started.

Equipment:

Scorpion Bowl

Ingredients:

3oz london dry gin
3 oz light rum
3 oz brandy
3 oz fresh orange juice
1.5 oz orgeat syrup
1.5 oz fresh lemon juice
1.5 oz amontillado sherry

for the volcano:
2 oz 151-proof rum
ground cinnamon

Method:

Fill Scorpion Bowl with ice. Add gin, rum, brandy, orange juice, orgeat, lemon juice, and sherry to bowl and stir to combine. Fill volcano with 151 rum and carefully set on fire before serving. Toss pinches of cinnamon into fire to create a crackling, fireworks effect.

Serves 2-4 people

Vermouth of the South

It doesn't get much more classic than gin. It also doesn't get much more distinct or polarizing, at least in the world of booze. What started out as medicine a very long time ago has evolved into a most flavorful British spirit. Now we know that not everyone loves gin, or at least thinks they don't love it, so we are always on the lookout for fun new drinks to make with the stuff! The point isn't to mask the taste of the gin, but rather to complement its unique flavors with other components, while softening those specific tastes to make them more approachable. 

Some of the most popular gins worldwide are those that we all know: Tanqueray, Bombay, Beefeater, etc are all traditional London Dry Gins that fall into that specific flavor profile we're all familiar with. A relatively new player in the gin game is Hendrick's, which hails from Scotland. While Hendrick's uses the traditional juniper berry/botanical blend we all know and (maybe) love, they also infuse their products with the pleasing flavors of cucumber and rose. These additions add a subtle finish to the spirit, without overpowering its traditional gin roots. We wanted to make a cocktail that appreciates the unique flavors in Hendrick's, honors the gin spirit, and still be something that we think most people would enjoy drinking. We used nothing but the most old-school ingredients, so we hope you enjoy. 

Equipment:

Cocktail mixing glass
Bar spoon
Cocktail strainer

Ingredients:

1.5 oz Hendrick's Gin
.75 oz vermouth rouge (or sweet vermouth)
.5 oz vermouth blanc (or dry vermouth)
1 oz red grapefruit juice

Method:

Combine all ingredients in mixing glass with ice. Stir and strain into stemmed cocktail glass.

 

 

Roman Candle

Yup, the 4th of July is right around the corner and we're working on a special batch of fireworks-themed cocktails. Enter the Roman Candle.

But it's not just a name that makes a drink good for the 4th. It needs to be relatively easy to make, refreshing and easy to drink. Well, the Roman Candle meets all those criteria. 

We've basically taken a gin and tonic and added a little zest with the Italian liqueur Aperol. Italy...Rome...Roman... get it? Okay, so it's kinda a stretch.

We've also used one of our favorite gins, Prairie Gin. Unlike our attempt to make this drink firework-themed, this gin is no joke. It's totally organic and made with a hint of juniper and has a light finish that you need for a summer cocktail. 

 

equipment:

cooler glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Prairie Gin
.5 oz Aperol
tonic water
lime wedge for garnish

 

method:

Pour the gin and Aperol in the glass filled with ice. Top with tonic water and garnish with a lime. Think you can handle that?

 


Tree's Knees

If you're a lover of classic cocktails, you should be familiar with the Bee's Knees cocktail. 

Created in Paris in the early 1930s, this cocktail is the definition of simplicity. Just three ingredients (four if you count the ice), it's what a balanced cocktail should be. But sometimes, it's fun to play around with a classic.

Such frivolity took place when we had our Juniper June event. There were literally dozens of boozy options for folks to try and one of the cocktails was this one. 

Made with Bourbon Barreled Big Gin from Seattle, it already had a little more complexity than the honey-lemon-gin counterpart. But the real secret was the swap of pure maple syrup in place of honey! The earthly flavor of the maple was an ideal balance to the woody gin.

 

EQUIPMENT:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

INGREDIENTS:

2 oz Bourbon Barreled Big Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz pure maple syrup


METHOD:

Add all three ingredients to a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. 

Midnight Negroni

We've said it before, but Port just doesn't seem to get enough love when it comes to cocktails. To be called a Port (or sometimes Vinho do Porto), it must be produced in Portugal. Other wine produced in the style of port are available, but we choose to go with the real thing. 

It's a fortified wine, meaning the wine has had other alcohol added to it. In Portugal, they do this by adding a grape distillate called aguardente (similar to brandy) to the wine, which stops the fermentation by killing the yeast, leaving more residual sugars in the wine. Regardless of how it's made, even just a little Port can enhance a cocktail like this one. 

But we suggest using Port wisely. It's very flavorful and can overwhelm a cocktail if you use too much or pair it with subtle spirits. So we're reaching for a great (local!) gin, Abernathy Gin from TennSouth. It's a New American style, but still has enough botanical flavor to work perfectly in this cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Abernathy Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1 oz sweet vermouth
.5 oz Port (any kind will do)
strip of orange zest for garnish


method:

Add all spirits to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir until fully chilled and strain into a chilled rocks glass with fresh ice. Garnish with orange peel.

Clover Club 2.0

The original Clover Club cocktail pre-dates Prohibition and comes from a men's club in Philly of the same name that would meet regularly at a local hotel. One of the first published recipes 1917 was in The Ideal Bartender by Thomas Bullock and listed the recipe simply. "Fill large Bar glass full Fine Ice. 2 pony Raspberry Syrup. 2 jigger Dry Gin. 1 jigger French Vermouth. White of 1 Egg. Shake well; strain into Cocktail glass and serve." Over the years, the recipe has been published in many forms, often omitting the vermouth and adding fresh lemon. While most recipes call for raspberry syrup, we found one adapted from 1907's Drinks by Paul Lowe that uses raspberry jam.

But we're mixing this classic up just a bit by swapping out fresh raspberries in place of raspberry syrup or jam. The result is exceptional, if we do say so ourselves. But part of what makes this drink so tasty (besides the fresh raspberries) is the choice of gin. 

We're using Sipsmith Gin from London. It's a true London Dry Gin and the bold botanicals make it ideal for cocktails of all sorts. It's made with 10 botanicals from around the globe; Macedonian juniper berries, Bulgarian coriander seed, French angelica root, Spanish licorice root, Italian orris root, Spanish ground almond, Chinese cassia bark, Madagascan cinnamon, Sevillian orange peel and Spanish lemon peel. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Sipsmith London Dry Gin
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
3 fresh raspberries, plus one for garnish
1 bar spoon granulated sugar
egg white

 

method:

Start by placing three fresh raspberries in your cocktail shaker and add the bar spoon of sugar. Muddle to mash and release the juices of the raspberries. Add gin, lemon, simple syrup and egg white and cover. Dry shake (without ice) for at least a minute, shaking it violently to emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air. Add ice and shake very hard for another minute before double-straining into a chilled glass. Garnish with remaining raspberry.

 


The Most Unusual Negroni

We're just days away from (sold out) Juniper June at the Riverwood Mansion and it would be an understatement to say we're kinda excited. 

Of course we know the venue will be beautiful and the booze will be flowin' as we raise money for a great local cause, On Target 4 Vets...but there's something else that's got us really electrified. It's the idea that we're about to blow some freakin' minds when it comes to what people think about GIN. We're not talking about the gin that you stole from your parents liquor cabinet in high school. We've pulled together some of the best, most diverse gins from around the world. Scotland? Check. London? Check. Nashville?? Yup, check that too. 

But we really have to give a special shout out to Hendrick's Gin. Hendrick's broke into the American market a few years ago and completely changed what so many people thought about gin. Affectionally often called the "gateway gin," Hendrick's is a kinder, gentler gin with subtle flavors of cucumber and rose. It's a "most unusual" gin and when paired with a couple non-traditional Negroni ingredients, you get this cocktail. If you're lucky enough to have a ticket to this coming 3st of the Month, you'll be able to taste it for yourself, as it's one of two drinks they'll be serving up!

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Hendrick's Gin
1.5 oz Lillet Blanc (good stuff, you should own a bottle for your home bar)
1.5 oz Aperol (also good stuff that you should own)
strip of orange zest for garnish


method:

Add your spirits to a cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a chilled rocks glass with fresh ice. Express the oils from the peel into the cocktail and drop it in the glass to garnish.

Nashgroni

Hopefully by now you're clued into the fact that we make cocktails with shit we like. Be it a classic booze or something small and new to the market, we love turning you on to the stuff you should be drinking.

So, listen up: here's two things you should be drinking in one. A Negroni and Corsair's Barrel Aged Gin.

We could go on and on (and we have) about how much we love a good Negroni. One of the many reasons we love this drink is how easily you can alter it with the substitution of ingredients. In the case of this cocktail, we've held back the Campari and reached instead for Cynar. Owned by Campari, Cynar is an artichoke-based amaro from Italy. Compared to Campari, the flavor is softer, fuller and rounder than its bright red cousin. 

The other key to this being a NASHgroni is the gin. Hailing from hometown hero Corsair Distillery, this barrel aged gin is unlike any other gin on the market. Though there are certainly other delicious gins that are aged in barrels, we know of no other that ages them in spiced rum barrels. This step gives their already delicious rum a level of additional spice and sweetness that pairs perfectly with Cynar in this cocktail. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Corsair Barrel Aged Gin
1.5 oz Cynar
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
strip of orange zest for garnish 


method:

Super simple - just add the booze to a cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain it into a rocks glass with fresh ice and garnish with orange zest. 

Dry Gin Fizz

We've already shared a recipe for the Ramos Gin Fizz. This ain't that. 

The standard Gin Fizz has a history that dates back to the late 1880s when six versions of the "fizz" were included in Jerry Thomas' Bartender's Guide (the first cocktail book published...pretty cool stuff). The Gin Fizz grew in popularity, with many variations on the standard.

To make the basic gin fizz, you really only need four ingredients; gin, lemon, sugar and club soda. Once you start adding other ingredients like egg whites or cream, you have entirely new versions with different properties. An egg yolk makes a Golden Fizz, a whole egg makes a Royal Fizz, champagne in place of club soda makes a Diamond Fizz...and so on. This version is essentially a Silver Gin Fizz, but we've made it with something special - a gin like no other. 

St. George Spirits makes three distinct gins (available individually or as a set of three little bottles); Terroir Gin, Botanivore Gin and Dry Rye Gin. The latter, Dry Rye Gin, is the key to this Dry Gin Fizz. As the name might suggest, it starts with 100% pot-distilled rye, giving a base of spice and richness before then adding six botanicals. Heavy on juniper, it also includes black peppercorn, caraway, coriander, grapefruit peel, lime peel - all of which were selected to compliment the juniper. It's a gin-lover's gin. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins or fizz glass

ingredients:

2 oz St. George Dry Rye Gin
1 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
1 egg white
1.5 oz club soda, chilled


method:

The key to this cocktail is a dry shake (without ice) to emulsify the egg white and incorporate air into the cocktail. So start by adding the gin, lemon, simple and egg white to your cocktail shaker. Cover and shake it HARD for a minimum of one minute. When you think you're done shaking...you're not. Shake it some more. Then add ice and shake it again...until your arm wants to fall off. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into your glass. Let settle for a few seconds before adding your club soda. 

Orange Negroni

Gin is made for cocktails. 

You can shoot tequila straight, sip frozen vodka at dessert and drink whiskey on the rocks, but gin is made for cocktails. 

We were quickly reminded of that fact when we tasted Damrak Gin for the first time. With a flavor unlike any gin we've ever tasted (and we've tasted a shit load of gin), Damrak turns down the juniper and turns up the citrus. Orange, to be exact. It's a mandatory 'must' for any gin lover - or even a gin hater for that matter, cause this stuff will turn them. But we shouldn't be surprised that it's so good. It comes from Bols - the same folks that make Bols Genever. They've been making spirits since 1575, so it's pretty safe to say they know their shit.

To play up the natural orange flavor of Damrak, we've added just a couple dashes of orange bitters to the classic Negroni recipe. Try it. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Damrak Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters
twist of orange peel for garnish.


method:

Combine the spirits and bitters in your mixing glass. Fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a pre-chilled rocks glass and add fresh ice. Garnish by expressing the oils of the orange zest into the cocktail before dropping it into the glass.

White Negroni

The original Negroni is a pretty simple cocktail. Equal parts gin, sweet vermouth and Campari. But when you want to play around a bit, it's easy to create new versions of the Negroni by swapping out a couple items.

For this one, we wanted to create what's called a "white" Negroni, although it's pretty easy to see that the thing is more yellow than white. It's all relative, people!

The first substitution is dry vermouth in place of sweet vermouth. Vermouth is what's referred to as an 'aromatized' wine, meaning it's been infused with herbs and botanicals to impart extra flavor. What some might not know is that both dry, which is white in color, and sweet, which is red in color, are both actually made using a base of white wine. The sweet vermouth simply has more ingredients that add the deeper color. 

The second swap is Suze in place of Campari. A French aperitif, Suze is made using wild genetian. This plant imparts bitterness to Suze and is actually a common ingredient in many digestifs, including Aperol, Underberg and Angostura Bitters.

For the gin, we're using Big Gin from Seattle. It's got a robust flavor that can stand up well to Suze.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.25 oz Big Gin
1.25 oz Suze
1.25 oz dry vermouth
grapefruit zest for garnish


method:

Add the spirits to the cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into rocks glass with fresh ice. 

Bee's Knees

Created in Paris in the early 1930s, this cocktail is the definition of simplicity. Just three ingredients (four if you count the ice), it's what a balanced cocktail should be. 

We think a great cocktail should have a relationship between three elements: flavor of the booze (bitter, herbal, woody etc.), acidity and sweetness. If one gets too far out of whack, you end up with something that just doesn't seem right. Ingredients like bitters can help boost the flavor. Citrus juices are the go-to for acidity. And more often than not, simple syrup is used for sweetness.

But with this cocktail, all you need is to start with a great gin. Good thing we have one. Made right here in Nashville, Corsair Distillery has won a butt-load of awards for their Artisan Gin. And for good reason. It's made in very small batches using the 'gin-head' basket on their hand-hammered copper pot still to infuse the flavors of their unusual mix of traditional and unique botanicals.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz Corsair Artisan Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz honey syrup (equal parts honey and water)


method:

Add all three ingredients to a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice and strain into your chilled glass.

Dutch 75

Chances are you've had a French 75. They're commonplace on many cocktail menus, as the addition of Champagne seems to make them sell. That and, when made with good ingredients, they're really good.

But for this version, we're going to the grandaddy of gin - Genever. Pronounced "gin-KNEE-ver," it's the Dutch predecessor to gin. Made with a base of distilled malted wine, it has a subtle, softer flavor than most modern gins. 

Bols Genever has been around since 1575. Yup, you read that right. But until recently it was was hard to find here in the states. Lucky for us (and you), they'll be coming to Juniper June, so you'll get to taste it if you haven't already.

Make sure your Champagne is nice and cold prior to making this drink, as you'll pour it in at the end.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
champagne flute

ingredients:

1 oz Bols Genever
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
3 oz Brut Champagne 
lemon twist for garnish


method:

Add the Bols Genever, lemon and simple to a cocktail shaker. Shake with ice to chill and strain into a pre-chilled champagne flute. Top with champagne and garnish with lemon twist.

Lavender Ramos Gin Fizz

There's essentially two types of "gin fizz" cocktails. Those with cream and those without. Both have egg white and both are delicious, but you'll be amazed at how different they are. 

The Ramos Gin Fizz is a classic New Orleans cocktail that was invented in the 1880s by Henry Ramos. The original instructions called for 12 minutes of shaking time - needless to say, there were some seriously sore arms among those bartenders.

While we're not going to shake this thing for 12 minutes, it does require some serious shaking. The key to making it work is shaking twice. First, a dry shake without ice to help emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air and second, a shake with ice to add even more air and chill the cocktail. Both of these should be downright violent shakes, each lasting well over a minute. 

To make this unique, we're adding a little lavender bitters. A common ingredient that appears in gins, lavender really sets this off. If you don't have lavender bitters, just make it without - it will still be a damn good drink. You'll want to use a good, strongly-flavored gin like Edinburgh Gin for this one so the flavors come through the egg white and cream.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Edinburgh Gin
.75 oz heavy cream
.75 oz simple syrup
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 egg white
3-5 drops orange flower water
1 dash lavender bitters
1.5 oz club soda, chilled
a few dried lavender buds for garnish (optional)


method:

Add all ingredients except seltzer and garnish to a cocktails shaker (without ice!) and dry shake for at least one minute. When your arm gets tired, switch sides and shake again. When you think you're done, you're not...keep shaking. Then add ice and shake again...hard. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you're done.

Double-strain into a chilled collins glass and let settle for minute before topping with club soda. Sprinkle a few lavender buds on top.

Tan Lady

The original classic cocktail White Lady, is made with gin, cointreau, lemon and egg white. Don't let the fu-fu name fool you. While she make look delicate, this is one strong woman.

Depending on who you ask, the cocktail was first created in either 1919 at Ciro's Club in London, who originally made it with creme de menthe and later replaced that with gin. Others claim it was created at the famous Savoy Hotel in London in 1930. Either way, it's really good.

When we first tried Bourbon Barreled Big Gin, we were blown away (as referenced by how little is left in the bottle in this photograph!). There are a few barrel aged gins on the market (three of which will be served at Juniper June), but each is distinct thanks to the base gin and the types of barrels used. Big Gin is obviously (as the name implies) aged in bourbon barrels. It's light amber color hints at the woody notes in the flavor profile. It's subtle - not fully woody like a whiskey - and the botanicals of the gin still shine through. 

Since we're using this gin, we figured we should embrace the color and go ahead and make this "Lady" tan. So a quick swap of Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao (one of our FAVORITE spirits to mix into cocktails) added even more hue to this tasty drink. Unlike most triple sec you'll find out there, this stuff actually has FLAVOR! It's made using a historical recipe that includes spices and peels of curacao oranges.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
champagne saucer

ingredients:

2 oz Bourbon Barreled Big Gin
.5 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 egg white


method:

Add all the ingredients to a cocktail shaker, fill it with ice and shake it to chill. Strain into a pre-chilled glass. 

Rhubarb Sour

Gin sours have a place in cocktail history and lore. A quick google search will bring up over a million references...and for good reason. It's a match made in heaven.

Gin has the robust flavor that can stand up to tart citrus, typically lime or lemon. So with this drink, we figured we should take the tartness up just a bit with everyone's favorite springtime sour - RHUBARB!

Made in Brookly, Morris Kitchen makes an outstanding Rhubarb Syrup. Similar to a shrub, it has a little apple cider vinegar to play off the natural tartness of the rhubarb. It also has cane sugar, which helps this cocktail from being completely face-puckering. If you're in Nashville, you can find a bottle at Hey Rooster General Store in East Nashville.

In order to not let the gin overtake the flavors of the rhubarb, we're using Prairie Gin. Some of you may recognize it, as they came to our very first 3st of the Month in August 2014 and we have used it in other cocktails ever since. It's a kinder, gentler gin. Not too intense with juniper and very smooth. Good stuff indeed. Check them out. They're a group of three family farms that not only grow the organic grains used in their spirits, but own the distillery as well. 

Okay, enough rambling...on to this tasty-ass cocktail!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
double-old fashioned glass

ingredients:

2 oz Prairie Organic Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.75 oz Morris Kitchen Rhubarb Syrup
2 oz soda water/seltzer, chilled
fresh thyme for garnish


method:

Combine the gin, lime and rhubarb syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into your glass with fresh ice. Top with soda and garnish with a sprig of thyme.

Bijou

Here's one to file away for the 'random useless knowledge' category should you ever be on Jeopardy. 

Another classic gin cocktail, the Bijou translates to jewel in French. Why you ask? Because it combines three spirits, each representing a different jewel - gin for diamond, vermouth for ruby and Chartreuse for emerald. Pretty cool, huh?

The drink dates way back to the 1880s when it was first mentioned in Harry Johnson’s 1882 Bartender’s Manual. It's another example of how sweet vermouth and gin go hand-in-hand but it's a intensely-flavored cocktail, thanks in part to the addition of the Chartreuse.

For this one, we've grabbed our bottle of Abernathy Gin. Made here in TN, it's made using a vapor infusion technique and a special blend of nine botanicals including juniper, coriander, cassia, citrus peels and pecans to create a New American craft gin, with less intense flavor than the traditional London Dry Gins.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

1 oz Abernathy Gin
1 oz sweet vermouth
1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 dash orange bitters
strip of orange zest to garnish


method:

Start by chilling your cocktail glass. Add the booze and bitters to your mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into your glass and garnish with orange zest.

Classic G&T

Chances are the first gin drink you ever had was a gin and tonic. That's no accident.

The cocktail was introduced by the army of the British East India Company in India. In India and other tropical regions, malaria was a serious problem. Lucky for our us, it was discovered in the 1700s that quinine could be used to prevent and treat the disease, although the bitter taste was unpleasant. British officers in India in the early 19th century started adding water, sugar, lime and gin to the quinine in order to make the drink more palatable. Soldiers in India were already given a gin ration (lucky bastards), and the sweet concoction made sense. Over the years malaria became less of a problem, but the taste for tonic water remained. Most commercial tonic water today is highly sweetened and has a lot less quinine than the old 1700's recipes.

While you can certainly purchase good tonic water, we might suggest splurging for a bottle of Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic. It's essentially a quinine concentrate, stretched with a little seltzer or soda water. Once you've tried it you'll never buy bottled tonic water again. 

As for the gin in our G&T, we love how the subtle cucumber flavor of Uncle Val's Restorative Gin plays off the tartness of the quinine. Give it a try and we bet you will too.

 

equipment:

rocks glass
barspoon

ingredients:

2 oz Uncle Val's Restorative Gin
.75 oz Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic
4-5 oz seltzer or soda water
lime wedge


method:

This is an easy one. Just build it in the glass. Fill it with ice, add the Uncle Val's Restorative Gin and Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic then fill with seltzer. Give it a light stir and garnish with a lime.

The Best Gimlet Ever

If you're like us, you've probably had a Gimlet somewhere in your drinking history...and you were not that impressed. Too often they're either WAY to tart, too sweet or honestly just not that delicious. Well, news flash... you haven't had this gimlet.

You'll find recipes that call for Rose's lime juice. Don't use it. While that stuff might have a place in some cocktails, it does not belong in this one. Instead, follow the easy recipe at the bottom of this post to make your own lime cordial with just lime zest and simple syrup. You can thank us later.

As for the gin, we reached for good ol' Plymouth Gin on this one because a classic cocktail deserves a classic gin. They've been making it since 1793, so you know they have to be doing something right! It's a unique, protected style of gin that only they make. Go get some.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Plymouth Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.75 oz lime cordial (see easy recipe below)
slice of lime for garnish


method:

Place your glass in the freezer to get it ice cold. Add your gin, lime juice and lime cordial to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Give it a good, spirited shake and strain into your chilled glass before dropping in the slice of lime to garnish. 

lime cordial 

1 lime, washed
4 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)

Using a microplane grater, remove all the zest from the lime. Add the lime zest to your simple syrup, stir to combine and let it sit at room temperature for 15-20 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh strainer, pressing the remaining zest to get every damn drop of deliciousness. Refrigerate until needed.