Black Night

If ever there were proof that you can have fun with your cocktails and still make them themed, this one is it! 

Made with Virgil Kaine Ginger-Infused Bourbon, we've darkened things up with muddled fresh blackberries, a little black currant liqueur and a touch of sweet vermouth. The spice of the ginger pairs perfectly with the fruit flavors - and it's all rounded out with the addition of sweet vermouth. Seriously, if you don't believe us, try it without the vermouth and you'll see what a difference one ingredient can make!

But the real key to this cocktail is double-straining. Nobody wants a bunch of damn seeds in their cocktails, so do it right and strain this cocktail. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail or coupe glass

ingredients:

5 fresh blackberries (plus more for garnish)
2 oz Virgil Kaine Ginger Infused Bourbon
.5 oz Creme de Cassis liqueur (or dark blackberry liqueur)
.5 oz sweet vermouth

method:

Muddle blackberries in your cocktail shaker before adding remaining ingredients and filling with ice. Shake vigorously and double-strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with a couple blackberries and serve.

Manhattan to Newport

When the good folks at Knob Creek sent us a bottle of their small batch rye whiskey, we thought; "Gee, this stuff sure is good all by itself in a glass!" Alas, we are an organization that strives to bring you all the best in cocktails, so we got started mixing. A good rye doesn't need much to make it sing, so rather than muck it up with a bunch of juice and syrup, we kept it simple with a slightly minty take on an old classic.

We see hiptsers wincing down shot after shot of Fernet Branca alongside cans of PBR in what we can only assume is an attempt to be the coolest member of a hats and suspenders club? As much as we love Fernet, a little can go a long way, and its deep, complex flavors are sometimes best served in a supporting role to whiskey's leading man. 

Equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
chilled martini glass

Ingredients:

2 oz Knob Creek Rye Whiskey
.5 oz Fernet Branca
.5  oz sweet vermouth

Method:

Shake all ingredients in cocktail shaker until shaker is frosty and strain into prepared glass. Do not garnish with a maraschino cherry as that will ruin the drink.

Saint Snapper

Even though we think that whiskey is at its most perfect neat in a glass, sometimes a delicious cocktail is what we want to drink, and who are we to stand in our own way? Do what you want to do and drink what you want to drink, that's what we say. 

Nashville's own Belle Meade Bourbon has been making a name for itself these past few years, quickly becoming one of the most popular whiskeys in town. While it stands strong on its own, it also plays well with others. Here at 3st of the Month, we like to play around with time-honored standards and offer a new spin, perhaps a fresh twist on a drink that you might not have had in a while.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Cocktail strainer
Rocks glass

Ingredients:

2 oz Belle Meade Bourbon
1 oz cranberry juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.25 oz lime juice
.25 oz herbsaint (or absinthe)

Method:

Rinse rocks glass with Herbsaint, discard remainder. Fill glass with ice. In cocktail shaker, combine bourbon, cranberry juice, simple syrup, and lime juice with ice. Shake and strain into prepared rocks glass.

Penicillin Villain

Some flavors are just simply comforting. They may remind you of a certain memory or time in your life, or they might just make you feel good and safe and warm. For us; vanilla, honey, ginger, and lemon recall days of mom helping us feel better for whatever reason. Of course nowadays cocktails have the same effect, so why not mix it all up in a glass? Instant warm fuzzies!

We think its great that so many people in Nashville are making great products these days, and we love using them as often as possible. One such product is Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey from our good friends at SPEAKeasy Spirits Distilling. Smooth rye whiskey with a delicious vanilla flavor, Pennington's makes a great shot, and also a great cocktail. We've added some other complimentary flavors and come up with some serious comfort in a glass.

Equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer
rocks glass
lemon twist for garnish

Ingredients:

1.5 oz Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey
.5 oz Barsmith Honey Ginger Cocktail Syrup
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes lemon bitters

Method:

Combine all ingredients in cocktail mixing glass with ice. Stir with bar spoon until well mixed and very cold. Strain into rocks glass with fresh ice and garnish with lemon twist.

Trinity Killer

Ask any parent who their favorite child is, and they (should hopefully) say that it would be impossible to choose. That's kind of how we feel about whiskey. Some days we really love our charcoal-filtered Tennessee stuff, other days its the sweet Kentucky bourbon. We'll even have a single-malt scotch moment from time to time. One thing that really gets us excited is when a whiskey comes along that doesn't quite fit into any existing category. Made in Virginia, Wasmund's Single Malt Whisky flaunts whiskey traditions, and that makes us all tingly.  

Wasmund's starts with a unique production method.  For starters, they use all barley. No corn in this bottle. They also smoke their malt with apple and cherry wood, which no one else does. On top of that, they never chill their whiskey during production, another thing hardly anyone does, which helps preserve the rich flavors throughout the process.

What does all this do for us, the drinker, you might ask? Well, the end result is a complex, smoky-yet-fruity whiskey that tastes more like a scotch than it does any whiskey from its neighbors in Tennessee and Kentucky. Wasmund's is produced and bottled in small batches, so it might just taste a little different from bottle to bottle, but we think it's scotch-like characteristics make a damn fine cocktail. The herby flavors of Carpano Antica and Yellow Chartreuse bring the whiskey to life and a touch of a good-quality grenadine adds just enough sweetness to even it all out.

Equipment

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer

Ingredients:

1 oz Wasmund's Single Malt Whisky
1 oz Carpano Antica sweet vermouth
.25 oz Yellow Chartreuse
1 bar spoon Eli Mason Grenadine
2 dashes Angostura Bitters

Method

Combine all ingredients with ice in mixing glass. Stir and strain into a rocks glass

Rosemary's Baby

When you have great bourbon, it's important to not overdo it on the cocktail. And Elijah Craig is pretty great bourbon.

Named for Reverend Elijah Craig, who discovered the process of making true Kentucky whiskey when he stored his wares in barrels that had been charred in a fire. 

For this cocktail, we went with a spin on a classic Old Fashioned - but with a little herby goodness thanks to the rosemary simple syrup. To make it at home, start with a cup of water and a cup of sugar. Bring them to a boil and stir to dissolve. As soon as you remove it from the heat, add three sprigs of rosemary and let it steep for at least 30 minutes before straining. Once made, it will keep in the fridge for weeks. 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Elijah Craig Small Batch
.5 oz rosemary simple syrup
dash orange bitters
garnish with orange peel and rosemary sprig

method:

Combine everything but your garnish in your cocktail mixing glass and add ice. Stir to chill and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Add the orange and rosemary garnish and serve.

Gingerade

This simple cocktail manages to surprise by being utterly refreshing and delicious despite its seeming simplicity.

This is thanks to the depth of flavor added by Virgil Kaine Ginger Bourbon from Charleston, South Carolina. The folks at Virgil Kane macerate young Yellow Hawaiian ginger with their bourbon that they source from their local Spade & Clover Gardens. Their distillation process also distinguishes itself by using a unchilled filtration process because the more common chilled filtration process actually removes some of the flavor - who knew! Anyways, the point is that this stuff has a great strong flavor that's able to carry itself when enjoyed in a simple cocktail like this and also in more elaborate creations. 

Virgil Kaine is soon to be distributed in Nashville, so be sure to keep your eyes peeled for it at the liquor store!

equipment:

glass
bar spoon

ingredients:

2 oz Virgil Kaine Ginger Bourbon
4 oz lemonade (homemade is best)

method:

Pour your bourbon and lemonade in a glass with ice. Stir and serve. Think you can handle that?


Late 1800's

We love bourbon! Correction...we love good bourbon. Lucky for us, this stuff is REALLY GOOD bourbon! 

Old Forester 1897 is a small batch bourbon, bottled in bond, and is made using many of the production techniques used in 1897. What does it mean for a bourbon to be bottled in bond, you ask? The Bottled-in-Bond Act was passed in 1897 to assure consumers that the bourbon they were drinking was made by one distiller, in one distillery, in one season. The bourbon must also be aged at least 4 years in a federally bonded warehouse and be bottled at 100 proof. Old Forester 1897 was created to celebrate the strict bourbon traditions that have begun to slip away in recent years. Now that we have a little more knowledge of the history of bourbon, lets make some drinks with it!  

The fruit and spice notes found in the bourbon, along with the oaky layers of caramel and vanilla imparted by barrel aging don't need much; it tastes great neat in a glass by itself! Since we're making cocktails here though, we add just a little bit of honey syrup to complement the natural sweetness of the bourbon, and the rich herbaceousness of the amaro will open up all of the earthy, smoky qualities created in the barrel.

Equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer
cocktail glass

Ingredients:

2 oz Old Forester 1897 Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
.25 oz honey syrup (equal parts honey and water)
.5 oz Zucca amaro

Method:

Stir ingredients with ice to chill and strain into a chilled glass. 

Fig and Fox

Though it technically can't be called Scotch, Copper Fox Rye Whiskey is made with a generous amount of smoked malt, giving it a smoky flavor similar to Scotch, but with the spice of a great rye whiskey. 

Copper Fox Rye Whiskey is one of the many amazing brands joining us for Best of the Barrel. Hailing from Virginia, the folks at Copper Fox Distillery spent a lot of time in Scotland studying the art and science behind making Scotch. The brought this knowledge to their distillery and now make and distribute their products around the country.

For this cocktail, we wanted to play off of the smoky flavor of the Copper Fox Rye and round it out with rich flavors from the fig jam, port wine and black walnut bitters. But it's the acidity of the lemon juice that really sets this one of. Without it, it would be just sweet and smoky. With it, it's a perfectly-balanced (if we do say so ourselves) cocktail.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

Ingredients 

1.5 oz Copper Fox Rye Whiskey
2 tsp fig jam
.5 oz lemon
.5 oz port wine
2 dash black walnut bitters
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine the booze, lemon juice, fig jam, port wine and bitters in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake it vigorously to chill and incorporate the flavors of the jam. Double strain to remove particles into your chilled glass. Express the oils from the lemon peel into the cocktail and place on the edge of the glass to garnish.

Islay Vacation

If all you think of when you think of Scotch is old men in suits, it's time to expand your horizons. 

Scotch is essentially just whiskey, but with a little something extra... Peat. What is it? Well, let us tell you. Peat is basically old, decayed plant material that forms over thousands of years in certain areas. Scotland, for instance, is one of those areas. The peat is cut from the ground in blocks, dried and used as a fuel source. We'll come back to the use of peat in just a minute...

When making Scotch (and most spirits), grains (barley, rye, etc.) are turned into a mash (think runny oatmeal) and yeast eats the sugars, creating alcohol. That mash is then distilled and the booze is aged in barrels. By allowing the grains to partially germinate, it converts starches into sugars. But you want to stop the germination process with heat before the grains actually sprout. A 'peated' whisky refers to the use of peat as the heat source in drying the grain prior to making the mash. The smoky flavors from the peat add significant character the end product, making Scotch unique from other whisk(e)ys. 

Now that we've had a history lesson, let's talk about this cocktail. Since Scotch has so much flavor, we figured we would use it in a Tiki drink, a perfect cocktail to appreciate the flavors of Scotch without slapping you across the face with them. The use banana, in particular, is a great partner for the flavors of good Scotch. In this case, we're using Laphroaig (pronounced like this). It's been around for 200 years, so you know they've got their shit together.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
collins glass

ingredients

1.5 oz Laphroaig Single Malt Scotch Whisky
.75 oz lime juice
.75 oz pineapple juice
.5 oz banana puree (just mash up a ripe banana until very smooth)
1 oz simple syrup
4 dashes tiki bitters
fresh mint for garnish

method:

Combine everything except the mint in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously with ice to chill. Transfer to a glass and garnish with fresh mint. 



Peach Puppy

Nothing goes with whiskey quite like fruit does, and summer's favorite fruit, the peach, might just go with whiskey better than any other. As summer comes to a close, we can relive its glory days with this sweet, refreshing, and easy cocktail. 

Like vodka, who's flavors are too numerous to count these days, more and more whiskey makers are branching out into flavors.  While some of these flavored spirits taste great all by themselves, they are especially well suited for mixing into cocktails. Bird Dog Peach Whiskey is no exception. With its peachy sweetness it makes for a nice, easy to take shot, as well as some damn fine summery cocktails. Here we've mixed it with Pennington's Vanilla Rye (made right here in Nashville!) and some sparkling soda water that will make you think of peach pie on a hot summer day.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Bird Dog Peach Flavored Whiskey
.5 oz Pennington’s Vanilla Rye Whiskey
.25 lemon juice
soda water
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine both whiskeys and the lemon juice in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Top with a splash of soda water, garnish with lemon zest and enjoy!

Maple Leaf

Although we love our neighbors to the north, we have always presumed ourselves to be better makers of whiskey down here in Tennessee and Kentucky. Traditionally, Canada has produced sweet, mellow, easy-drinking whiskey (which they spell whisky-weird, eh?) that often comes in a purple velvet bag and lacks very many distinctive characteristics.  

Historically, Canadian whisky was made primarily from corn, with a small amount of rye added to impart a more traditional whisky flavor. This whisky was then blended over and over in order to be consistently light in both color and flavor. The fine folks at Forty Creek have made great strides to change our minds about whisky-from-the-north, and it seems to be working. They distill rye, barley, and corn separately to highlight the characteristics that each grain brings to the party, and then blend them all for aging in oak barrels. This process add fruitiness, spiciness, and a distinct nutty quality unique to their product. While their whisky is great straight, it is perfect in this take on the traditional whisky sour.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Forty Creek Canadian Whisky
.75 oz lemon juice
.5 oz maple syrup
2 bar spoons orange marmalade
1 egg white

method:

Add all ingredients to your cocktail shaker and shake, without ice. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you can add ice. Then cover the shaker and shake it again - hard. Double strain (using both your cocktail strainer and mesh strainer) to remove the bits of marmalade into your glass.

On The Way To Atlanta

Southern by the grace of God. While we love many different places all over the world, we are proud of our southern roots. Aside from maybe the humidity and mosquitos, there's not much about the south that we don't think is great. We've taken the Chattanooga Whiskey Company's 1860 Reserve Whiskey and crafted a cool, refreshing cocktail loaded with fruit and botanicals to take you back to a genteel, relaxed moment in time when mosquitos were just a fact of life and the only way to beat the heat was with an iced-down drink in your hand.  

The Spicy, herbal notes of the Chattanooga 1816 Reserve are well complemented by the flavor of pears; both in the Rothman and Winter Pear Liqueur and the fresh pear puree included in this drink. Just a touch of lavender provides a perfect aromatic complement to the bright sweetness of the whiskey and fruit. While we think this drink is great during the warm summer months, it can be enjoyed year round.

This whiskey drink takes a little prep, but it's worth it. To make the pear puree, start with fresh, ripe (or even overripe) pears. Peel and pit them and put 'em in a blender until smooth. And for the lavender syrup, make a simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water) and add 1 tablespoon of dried lavender flowers for each cup of water. Bring those to a boil with the water and strain the whole lot once it's cooled. It will keep in the fridge for weeks. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
collins or cooler glass

ingredients:

2 oz Chattanooga 1816 Reserve Whiskey
.5 oz Rothman and Winter Pear Liqueur
1 oz pear puree
.25 oz lavender syrup
2.5 oz seltzer

method:

Combine all ingredients except seltzer in a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake to chill. Strain into your glass with fresh ice and top with seltzer. 

Tennessiki

Tiki drinks have made a huge comeback in the world of cocktails, and you won't hear any complaints from us! What's not to love about fruity, fun drinks with exotic ingredients? Not to mention all of the cool, kitschy glassware and garnishes that come along with tiki! While some people may think that tiki drinks are all sweet, sugary concoctions that your too-tan aunt Linda drank by the pool, that actually couldn't be further from the truth. While little paper umbrellas and bright red cherry garnishes might appear from time to time, tiki drinks are most often crafted from tart, even bitter ingredients that highlight the small amount of sweet fruit included in the cocktail.

Of course, when one thinks tiki, they probably think rum. Tiki can be made with just about any spirit you want to include. There are very few rules to tiki; it is a state of mind more than anything! Of course our spin on tiki had to include a Tennessee element, so we thought why not use a little Tennessee whiskey instead of rum for that southern flair. Because fruit complements whiskey so well, tiki seemed only natural! Most of the fruit we use in this drink is tart, with only a little bit of sweet nuttiness coming from the amaretto. Although we may not be drinking this on a tropical island somewhere, this cocktail makes any day a day at the beach!

You could choose to make this as a shaken drink, but we opted to blend it up instead. Either way, it's a refreshing whiskey cocktail!

equipment:

blender
tiki glass

ingredients:

2 oz Clayton James Tennessee Whiskey
.5 oz amaretto liqueur
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.5 oz raspberry puree
.5 oz lime juice
1 oz orange juice
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
4-6 oz crushed ice

method:

Add all ingredients into the blend and process until smooth. Pour into glass and garnish with something frilly!

Ruby Red

In 1837, a young man from Ireland known for his remarkable whiskey-making skills, came to America with his family’s whiskey recipe that had been passed down for generations. Young Mr. McKenna settled in Kentucky and began producing whiskey at the distillery he founded in 1855 near Fairfield, KY. 

He was a stickler for aging his product and insisted the whiskey get proper aging in oak barrels prior to being sold to the public (this process was not as common back then). But, lucky for us, what he started still continues today, generations later. 

We decided we would take this tasty bourbon whiskey and make something classic - with a new spin. Instead of a classic sour, using lemon juice and egg white, we swapped out the lemon for ruby red. The extra sweetness and subtle bitterness of the grapefruit actually pairs quite well with the bourbon. The key, of course, is all about a proper two-step shake. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Henry McKenna Bourbon Whiskey
1 oz ruby red grapefruit juice
.5 oz Eli Mason Gomme Syrup
strip of orange zest and cherry for garnish

method:

Pour the booze, grapefruit juice, gomme syrup and egg white into your cocktail shaker. As with most egg white sours, you'll want to actually shake this cocktail twice. The first is what's called a 'dry shake,' without any ice. So go ahead and shake the shit out of it. Then fill with ice and shake like hell again. Strain it into a rocks glass with a couple fresh ice cubes, garnish and serve.

Forester Fire

If you follow along on our blog, you've probably seen that we love Ancho Reyes. It's the perfect way to add some heat to almost any cocktail, regardless of the base spirit.

In this case, we've started with another one of our favorites, Old Forester 86 proof. With a lower proof than some of the other Old Forester options, it's got a sweet and smooth finish that makes it worthy of its history. The first bourbon in America to be bottled for retail sale, Old Forester seemed to have fallen out of favor a few years ago, overtaken by the 'sex appeal' of newer products that came to market. But we absolutely LOVE this shit and are glad to see folks are coming around to enjoy it as much as we do!

Mix it with a little Ancho Reyes, lemon and simple, and you've got a slightly spicy whiskey sour that's ideal for sipping slowly or knocking back!

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Old Forester 86 Proof
.5 oz Ancho Reyes
.25 oz fresh lemon juice
.25 oz simple syrup
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine the Old Forester, Ancho Reyes, lemon juice and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a chilled glass. Garnish twist of lemon. 

Apple Barrel

Many cocktails are made with juice. But the juices you usually find are citrus juices. Lime, lemon, orange...you know, the usual. 

But this one uses apple juice. Yup, the stuff kids like. Just simple, tasty apple juice. But when you mix it with Wathen's Bourbon and add a little spice in the form of two special spirits, you get a complex, yet drinkable, cocktail strictly for adults. 

The first special spirit is Domaine de Canton. It's a ginger liqueur that goes great with both apples and Bourbon. The second is an ingredient more commonly found in Tiki drinks - Pimento Dram. It's an allspice liqueur that can be overwhelming if you're not careful. But just one little bar spoon is all this drink needs to set it off. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Wathen's Single Barrel Bourbon
2 oz apple juice
.5 oz Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur
1 bar spoon pimento dram
strip of orange zest to garnish

method:

Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker and shake with ice to chill. Strain into rocks glass with fresh ice. Express oils from orange zest over the cocktail and drop into glass before serving.


Cool Story, Bros.

Bartenders hear some of the most incredible stories. And perhaps few of the most lame stories. But the good bartenders will always pretend like it's a good one, regardless of how shitty the story may be. 

Some of the best booze also has great stories. Take Medley Bros. Bourbon, for instance. All you have to do is take one look at the label to know there's got to be a good story behind it. It is from Charles Medley and his son, Sam, who have been producing Wathen's Single Barrel for about 15 years now. Charles is the son of Wathen Medley, who is second from the right of the five brothers pictured on the label. 

Bottled at 102 proof, it's got some bite to the booze and is great for making cocktails, so we worked it into a cocktail that could lower the overall proof, yet showcase the flavors it got from aging 4 years in a barrel. 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

Ingredients:

.75 oz Medley Brothers Bourbon
.75 oz Dolin Rouge Sweet Vermouth
.75 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao
.25 oz Brandy
4 dashes Angostura Bitters
2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters
strip of orange zest for garnish

method:

Combine all ingredients (except the garnish of course) in a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into your chilled glass. express the oils from the peel into the cocktail and place on the rim to garnish. 

The Kernel

No, we're not talking about Mr. Sanders. We're talking about kernal as in corn. The king of the grains. 

A lot of the whiskey and bourbon our there is made with corn - but most of it is a blend of corn and some other grains - wheat, barley, rye, etc. This stuff from Tenn South Distillery is 100% corn. 

And thanks to that corn-centric mash, the finished whiskey has a unique flavor, bordering on fruity - even a little fresh banana fragrance, in fact. So we were playing around with it and came up with a combination of ingredients that might sound a little odd at first. But trust us. It works. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Tenn South Old King Corn Whiskey
.5 oz banana purée (just mash up a ripe banana so it's real good n' smooth)
.5 oz lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
splash of ginger ale
lemon twist for garnish

method:

Combine everything but the ginger ale and lemon garnish in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake like hell and strain it into your rocks glass with fresh ice. Top with ginger ale and garnish with lemon twist.

'Nilla & Nut Old Fashioned

Waaaaay back in August of 2014 we kicked off this adventure we call 3st of the Month with a little more than 200 friends on the 3rd floor of Acme Feed & Seed in downtown Nashville. We had a loose 'anything goes' theme of "Booze 101" and had about 12 different tables of products. 

One of those first tables belonged to a new local product, Pennington's Strawberry Rye Whiskey. It's got the spice of a great rye whiskey, but with natural strawberry flavors. It was a hit. 

But here we are one year later getting ready for our big anniversary party (and we're heading back to Acme), and we're not the only ones that have been busy this year. Pennington's is coming back with not one - but two - new flavors! Just like the original Strawberry Rye, their new Vanilla Rye and Peach Apricot Rye have the spice you expect from rye whiskey, but with natural flavors that make them a blast for creating cocktails... and they're pretty good in shots. Even better, though they are sweetened, they have just enough sugar to make them go down easy (about half the sugar of that 'sphere of flame' cinnamon whiskey).

For this one, we're playing around with the new Vanilla Rye. And it's soooo good!

equipment:

rocks glass
bar spoon

ingredients:

2 oz Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey
1 dash black walnut bitters
slice of orange

method:

This is an easy one - you can just build it in the glass! Start with a large cube of ice if you've got it. If you don't, that's fine. Just use a few regular cubes. Add in the booze and the bitters and stir it around for a minute or two to water things down a bit and toss in the orange slice before serving.