Goblin Punch

When we first saw Deadhead Rum, we knew it was begging to be included in a Halloween cocktail! C'mon, it's a friggin' shrunken head bottle!

But what cool packaging sometimes hides is a lack-luster product...not the case with this stuff. Though you often think of Mexico as a place for tequila and mezcal, this Mexican rum has a unique flavor, with hints of vanilla and oak. 

It's got a robust flavor that is perfect for cocktails - including this silly little Halloween-inspired drink made green with Midori melon liqueur. 

So, give it a shake, pour it up and get your Halloween party going!

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Deadhead Rum
.5 oz Midori melon liqueur
.5 oz fresh lime juice
2 dashes grapefruit bitters
.5 oz simple syrup
grenadine, lime zest and cherry for garnish

method:

Combine rum, midori, lime, bitters and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into glass. Garnish with a lime zest-wrapped cherry and a few dribbles of grenadine on the rim.

Queztal

Tiki. Rum. Punch. Maple Syrup. These all go together, right? Right. We know the whole maple syrup thing sounds weird, and we weren't sure about it ourselves at first, but once we tried it we were hooked. Almost any cocktail is going to have some sort of sweet component to it. This is usually simple syrup, occasionally with a flavor included, but almost always made with basic white sugar. Don't get us wrong, we are big fans and users of simple syrup, but why not mix it up a little bit? 

To avoid any confusion, we are talking about real, pure maple syrup. If you use something in a plastic or woman-shaped bottle you're drink won't be right, as that is corn syrup, which is completely different. Real maple syrup will have a slightly thinner texture and a more subtle flavor than it's processed counterpart.

Enough about syrup, let's talk rum punch! While perfectly drinkable all summer long, this recipe will keep your tiki dreams alive well into the fall. The recipe below is for one drink, but is easily translated into a party punch that will serve many

Equipment

Cocktail shaker

Ingredients

1.5 oz Pyrat Rum
.5 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz orange juice
.5 oz pineapple juice
1 oz maple syrup
2 dashes bitters

Method

Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake until well mixed and strain into a glass with fresh ice.

Black Daiquiri

Tiki drinks don't get much more classic (or easy to make) than a daiquiri. The tart lime juice mixed with sweet rum will put you right into a Key West state of mind. We know that Ernest Hemingway was a big fan of these drinks, inspiring small modifications at his favorite places and even getting some new versions of this classic named for him. We made a little modification for ourselves, and we think that if Hemingway had gone black, he might not have gone back. 

You may hear daiquiri and think of a bright red strawberry frozen drink served in a neon plastic vessel somewhere near a beach. That really could not be further from what a true daiquiri is. Typically a daiquiri is made with white rum, lime juice, and sugar, shaken up and served over crushed ice.  It has a very light, refreshing flavor that is dominated by lime juice. While our version has the same components, we have highlighted the many flavors of sugar instead. That doesn't mean we're trying to sell you a sweet drink, just a cocktail with a richer depth of flavor that can be enjoyed year round. 

Instead of white rum, we've used black, which retains much more of the molasses flavor that gets removed from the white stuff. And instead of white sugar, we made our daiquiri with a demerara simple syrup, made with demerara sugar, which is a less refined type of sugar with much more flavor than it's white cousin. Without making the drink any sweeter than it traditionally would be, these ingredients add a comforting warmth to this beach classic.

Equipment

Cocktail shaker
Crushed ice

Ingredients

2 oz Kraken Black Rum
1 oz Eli Mason Demerara Syrup
1 oz fresh lime juice

Method

Combine all ingredients in cocktail shaker with ice cubes. Shake until shaker feels frozen on the outside and strain into cocktail glass over crushed ice.

Painkiller

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

One of the newest members of the tiki family, the Painkiller was originally invented at the Soggy Dollar Bar in the British Virgin Islands. Quickly rising in popularity, this cocktail is one of the few tiki drinks to actually incorporate coconut, giving it that real toes-in-the-sand beachiness that you might not find in it's more metropolitan cousins.

An important aspect of the painkiller is the rum used to make it. A Navy-Strength rum is imperative to the original recipe. Navy-Strength rum is generally bottled at cask strength, or at a higher proof than most rums. The name comes from British sailors who, while conquering and pillaging the Caribbean, were given a daily allotment of rum. The sailors tested the rum to see if it had been watered down by lighting it on fire and seeing if it would burn. This was the proof they needed and is also the origin of the term proof in relation to alcohol. 

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker

Ingredients:

2 oz Navy-Strength Dark Rum (Pusser's or Smith & Cross)
.75 oz pineapple juice
.75 oz orange juice
.5 oz cream of coconut
freshly grated nutmeg
pineapple leaf for garnish

Method:

In cocktail shaker with ice, combine rum, pineapple juice, orange juice, and cream of coconut. Shake vigorously and strain into glass filled with fresh ice. Top with nutmeg and garnish with pineapple leaf.

Floridita

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

You've heard of a daiquiri. You've heard of Ernest Hemmingway (we hope). And you might know that those two things go together like Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Used to be, when we thought of a daiquiri, it was of the strawberry variety; bright red and fresh out of the island oasis machine, possibly topped with canned whipped cream. How misinformed we were! The original daiquiris of Hemmingway's day were simple concoctions of rum, sugar, and lime with crushed ice. Papa Doblo (Daddy Double), as he was known to the bartenders in Cuba, earned his name by ordering two drinks at a time. Sometimes referred to as Daiquiri #2, the Floridita stays true to it's roots, embellished only with a little bit of Luxardo and grapefruit juice.

When it comes to frozen or blended drinks, ice becomes a measurable ingredient. You don't want to use too much or too little, otherwise the proportions of booze will be off, and we certainly don't want that! We consulted a bartender friend of ours on the matter and he gave us a great tip on measuring the perfect amount of ice. Simply fill the glass you plan on serving your drink in with ice, and dump that right into your blender. The liquid will fill in the gaps. This recipe makes one drink but is easy to multiply, just measure your ice accordingly.

Equipment:

Blender
Bar spoon

Ingredients:

2 oz Flor de Cana White Rum
.75 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz Luxardo
.5 oz grapefruit juice
granulated sugar
maraschino cherry for garnish

Method:

Combine two bar spoons of sugar, rum, lime juice, Luxardo, and grapefruit juice in blender with (measured) ice. Blend until smooth and garnish with a cherry. Ideally the drink will be thick enough for the cherry to rest on top with out sinking. Thats how you know you used the right amount of ice.

Mai Tai

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Invented (arguably) by Trader Vic in his Oakland, CA restaurant in 1944, the Mai Tai gets its name from from a friend of Vic's, who tasted his first ever concoction and remarked that the drink was "mai tai," a Tahitian colloquialism that roughly translates to "awesome." We can't argue there. 

You might hear Mai Tai and think of some drink you had at a Chinese restaurant somewhere that was extremely sweet and bright red, garnished with pineapple and cherries, but in actuality that drink couldn't have been further from the real thing. Sometime in the illustrious 70's the Mai Tai went off the rails in American restaurants, becoming bastardized into some sort of rum punch made with shitty, cheap liquor and finished with whatever sweet juice and grenadine was available. Of course they were popular! Your mom and her friends (and everyone else) loved sweet, fruity drinks of an unnaturally red hue! 

We want to put those days behind us and drink the real thing; which is a refreshing, boozy concoction straight from the beach.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Crushed ice

Ingredients:

2 oz Afrohead XO Aged Dark Rum   (Appleton Estate is traditionally used)
.75 oz fresh lime juice
.75 oz orgeat syrup
.5 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao 
fresh mint
Luxardo Maraschino Cherry

Method:

Fill cocktail shaker and with crushed ice. In shaker combine rum, lime juice, orgeat, and curaçao. Shake vigorously and strain over crushed ice in a tall glass. Garnish with mint and cherry.

Scorpion Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Now this is our idea of a drink! We've all had the ubiquitous Long Island Iced Tea before, (Just admit it. Its ok you were young...) and we have the Scorpion Bowl to thank. While most Tiki drinks were actually invented by a handful of guys in the United States, the Bowl is based on the idea of "communal drinks," which was a part of South Sea drinking custom. The Polynesians knew there was nothing quite like sharing a giant bowl of booze with their friends!

For this drink, you will need the vessel known as a scorpion bowl or tiki bowl. These are available in a range of options and prices. Other than buying online, you will probably have to keep your eyes peeled at flea markets or antique stores to find one. If you do find one grab it! They aren't all that common in the wild, but otherwise easy to buy with your trusty computer. Traditionally decorated with demons to guard your drink, they can also be found covered with palm trees, hula girls, and other South Pacific imagery. Another feature might be a volcano in the center of the bowl. Trust us, get the one with the volcano if you can, the added theatrics are well worth it. 

The easy association to make is between tiki drinks and rum, but actually a wide range of spirits are used to create these libations. Remember these cocktails were invented by Americans who had access to all sorts of ingredients. That is why you will find things like gin, cognac, sherry, and curaçao included. Our Scorpion Bowl recipe is actually quite easy to make, so invite a few friends and lets get started.

Equipment:

Scorpion Bowl

Ingredients:

3oz london dry gin
3 oz light rum
3 oz brandy
3 oz fresh orange juice
1.5 oz orgeat syrup
1.5 oz fresh lemon juice
1.5 oz amontillado sherry

for the volcano:
2 oz 151-proof rum
ground cinnamon

Method:

Fill Scorpion Bowl with ice. Add gin, rum, brandy, orange juice, orgeat, lemon juice, and sherry to bowl and stir to combine. Fill volcano with 151 rum and carefully set on fire before serving. Toss pinches of cinnamon into fire to create a crackling, fireworks effect.

Serves 2-4 people

El Presidente

People think of classic cocktails and assume they're to be made with gin - or maybe even whiskey or bourbon. But there's some great drinks out there made with rum.

Like anything in life, a cocktail is only as good as the ingredients you put into it. For this one, we're using one of our favorite rums, Caña Brava. Made with wild sugar cane molasses from Panama, it's distilled in a 1922 copper and brass still and has the perfect rum flavor that makes and outstanding foundation for cocktails. 

The other key ingredients in this are a really good orange curaçao (we like Pierre Ferrand) and homemade (or at least good quality) grenadine. If you use that nasty bright red stuff, this drink will simply not be the same.  

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Caña Brava Rum
1.25 oz Dry Vermouth
0.75 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao
0.5 oz good quality grenadine (like Eli Mason)
1 orange twist, for garnish

method:

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass. Add large, cold ice. Stir until very cold, strain and serve up in a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

Pirate Punch

We love a good Tiki drink. Scratch that. We love a great Tiki drink. 

But what makes a great one? It's a few things really. Obviously, you have to start with good booze. For this one we've used Shellback Rum. It comes in both a silver un-aged version and a tasty spiced rum. For the sake of simplicity, we made this with just the silver rum, but it would be even better with an ounce of each!

The second element you need is fresh fruit juices - and a variety of them ideally. And, finally, you need an element of spice. This can come in the form of a few dashes of bitters, a sprinkle of cinnamon or, in this case, a half ounce of Pimento Dram, an allspice liqueur. 

Because what really makes a good Tiki drink a great one is layers of flavor. Well, that and maybe a creative garnish or two. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
tiki cup (or any cup, really)

ingredients:

2 oz Shellback Silver Rum
1 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz fresh orange juice
1 oz pineapple juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz pimento dram (allspice liqueur)
2 dashes aromatic bitters
fresh fruit garnish

 

method:

Combine everything but the garnish in a cocktail shaker and shake the living daylights out of it to chill before straining into a glass with crushed ice. Garnish and serve. 

Rum Blush

The Caribbean is probably best known for their rums (and beaches, we'll give you that one). Essentially made from sugar, rum has much more to it than people realize. Besides the fact that some rums are distilled from fermented molasses and others from sugarcane juice, there's even more variety when you start talking about the influence of barrel aging, spices and other tweaks to a rum recipe. 

We've recently discovered Afrohead Rum. Imported from Trinidad in the West Indies, Afrohead is a premium aged dark rum that's silky smooth with notes of toasty oak and honey. Lucky for you, they're coming to our 1 year anniversary event in August, so you'll get to taste it for yourself! 

For this cocktail, we kept it simple so you could taste (and appreciate) the flavor of the rum. One thing to note - we're using our favorite grenadine from Eli Mason (made here in Nashville!), but don't expect this to be as delicious if you just grab the bright red stuff off the grocery store shelf. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Afrohead Premium Aged Dark Rum
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
.75 oz Eli Mason Classic Grenadine
lemon slice for garnish

method:

Combine the rum, lemon juice and grenadine in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a glass with fresh ice. Garnish with lemon slice.

Black Cat

If you attended our "Bitter Lovers" event in February or "Tres de Mayo" in May, you likely got to taste Black Magic Rum. A delicious dark spiced rum, Black Magic is fantastic whipped into all sorts of cocktails - like that crazy-delicious Black Magic Margarita they served in May?!?

But, we're getting ready for the 4th of July (and taking a month off from hosting), so we're playing around with cocktails and using fireworks as our inspiration. As far as fireworks go, if you didn't have Black Cat Firecrackers as a kid then you didn't have a childhood. Just saying.

And although this drink is not quite black, it does have quite a bang due to the 2.5 total ounces of booze and some tasty juices. The color gets a little darker thanks to a splash of blue curacao, but it's honestly pretty good (and a slightly more appealing color) without it. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
highball or cooler glass

ingredients:

2 oz Black Magic Rum
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz cranberry juice
.5 oz blue curacao
splash of club soda


method:

Combine the first four ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and pour into a glass. Top with club soda. 

Thai Basil Dark Rum Mojito

Remember when Mojitos hit the vein of popular culture? Suddenly they were popping up at bars across the country - simultaneously gaining hatred and disdain by every bartender having to muddle mint as Mojito fever took over. 

But they caught on for a reason. Simultaneously boozy and refreshing, they are kinda the perfect summer drink. 

We recently played around with the standard recipe and make a couple swaps. Instead of mint, we used Thai basil. It's amazingly aromatic (like mint), but with a distinctive flavor different from typical basil. If you don't have any Thai basil growing in your herb garden (you should), you can easily find it at Asian markets. 

The other swap was using Pyrat dark rum in place of white rum. To further enhance this richness, we also used demerara simple syrup instead of white simple syrup. The result is a richly-complex, yet still refreshing, cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
highball or tumbler glass

ingredients:

2 oz Pyrat Rum
1 oz demerara simple syrup (equal parts demerara sugar and water)
1/2 lime, cut into smaller pieces
3 sprigs Thai basil, divided
club soda


method:

Place the chunks of lime and two of the three sprigs of basil in the bottom of your cocktail shaker. Using a muddler, press the limes and basil to squeeze out the juice and release aromatics from the lime peel and fresh basil. Add rum and demerara simple to the shaker and toss in a few cubes of ice. Give it a quick shake and transfer entire contents to your chilled glass. Rinse the shaker with a splash of club soda to get every drop of boozy goodness and pour that into your cocktail. Top with more club soda and garnish with remaining sprig of Thai basil.

Key Lime Mojito

Mojitos. They're the bane of every bartender's existence. As soon as one gets ordered, everyone wants one. All that damn muddlin' and prep. 

But people order them for a reason. Because they're fucking delicious. Fresh mint, lime, sugar, rum and seltzer combine to make one hell of a tasty cocktail. 

We've got a bottle of the Wray & Nephew Overproof White Rum and were wondering what to do to a mojito that would make it stand up the intense flavor of really good rum. The answer was simple, swap out regular limes for key limes

Valued for their tart and bitter flavor, key limes have more acidity (and seeds) than regular limes. They're easy to find fresh in about any grocery store, so please don't cop out with bottled juice, okay?

 

equipment:

muddler
cocktail shaker
bar spoon
tall glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Wray & Nephew Overproof White Rum
2 whole fresh key limes
2 sprigs fresh mint (about 12 leaves)
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
5-6 oz seltzer
fresh mint and lime for garnish


method:

Cut the fresh limes into quarters and drop them into the bottom of your cocktail shaker. Add the fresh mint and sugar and muddle to press and release the juices from the lime and the flavor of the mint. Add the rum and stir with a bar spoon to finish dissolving the sugar. Add a few cubes of ice and give it a quick shake before transferring to your glass. Rinse the shaker with the seltzer and pour into glass. Give it a light stir and fill with more ice if needed. 

The Wreck

Mmmm, rum

Do you ever feel like rum does not get the attention it deserves? We do. Don't get us wrong, we love whiskey and tequila and gin....well, everything, but rum often seems to be left out when people talk about serious cocktails. 

Obviously, they have not had Pyrat Rum. Coming from the folks behind Patrón, you know it has to be good. And it is. So good in fact, you can drink it right from the bottle. Yeah, we tried.

So while you could (and should) try drinking Pyrat on the rocks, we figured it's getting warm so why not do something a little more refreshing?

Here you go...

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Pyrat Rum
1.5 oz fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice
.25 oz simple syrup
lime wedge


method:

Add the rum, juice and simple syrup to a cocktail shaker. Fill it with ice and give it a real quick, light shake (not so much to water it down) before dumping the entire thing into a chilled rocks glass. Squeeze a wedge of lime on top and you're good to go!

Jasper's Rum Punch

If you were partying with us last October, you know we love a good Tiki drink. So much so that we declared it Tikitober and had an event with nothing but tropical drinks. As good as that event was, we were only really missing one thing. Jamaican Overproof Rum

Called "overproof" for good reason, it's a ingredient in quite a few classic Tiki cocktails and packs one hell of a punch in the buzz department. Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum comes in at 63% alcohol - 126 proof! 

Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum is a top selling high-strength white rum. A legend in Jamaica, this is the real rum from the island where the rum comes from. It adds a unique rum character to drinks and is the essential ingredient in authentic Jamaican rum punch, made famous by Jasper LeFranc, the former head bartender of the Bay Roc Hotel in Montego Bay. 

This recipe below is best made in large batches, since it requires a little prep for Jasper's special mixer. Recipe adapted from Beachbum Berry's Potions of the Caribbean - an essential book for anyone that loves great Tiki drinks!

 

equipment:

tall cocktail glass
sizzle stick

ingredients:

1.5 oz Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum
1.5 oz Jasper's basic stock mix
crushed ice
slice of lime, cherry and mint sprig for garnish


method:

Fill your glass halfway with crushed ice and add rum and mixer. Swizzle it around until well chilled. Fill the remaining area with more crushed ice, swizzle again and garnish.


Jasper's Basic Stock Mix

Mix one cup of freshly-squeezed lime juice with 3/4 cup of granulated sugar. Stir until it dissolves and add 1/2 ounce of Angostura bitters and a heaping 1/2 teaspoon of freshly-grated nutmeg. Transfer to a bottle and refrigerate until using, shaking before each use.

The Jala-Piña

With a SOLD OUT May 3st of the Month only a few weeks away, it's time to start getting fresh with some of the participants. That means more recipes!

This sweet and spicy drink is made with one of the 20+ brands that will be in attendance, Captain Morgan Rums. They just recently released a trio of flavored white rums in grapefruit, coconut and pineapple. Needless to say, we had to get our hands on some to taste for ourselves! The flavor is fresh and natural, without too much sweetness. 

To get started, we reached for Captain Morgan Pineapple. This stuff is insanely versatile and is begging to be made into some poolside summertime cocktails, so we set out to do just that. Pairing it with fresh jalapeño peppers, lime and a little pineapple juice was a perfect combo. One thing to keep in mind when working jalapeños into a cocktail: strain it, strain it good. This way you get the flavor without too much heat. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2-4 slices fresh jalapeño pepper (depending on heat preference)
1/2 fresh lime, cut into pieces
2 oz Captain Morgan Pineapple Rum
2 oz pineapple juice


method:

Place the jalapeño slices and pieces of fresh lime in the bottom of a cocktail shaker. Muddle to release juice and flavors. Fill shaker with ice and add remaining ingredients. Cover and shake well to chill before double-straining into a rocks glass with fresh ice. 

Emerald Isle

When it comes time for St Patrick's Day, everyone starts thinking GREEN! Green socks, green shirts, green beer. Admit it, you've tried it...only to wake up in the middle of the night with green vomit. 

But while there are many natural ways to make drinks green, sometimes you just need to resort to the old fashioned way - food coloring. In this case, it's with the addition of two brightly-colored spirits; blue curacao and Midori. Both of these often get a bum rap for being 'foo-foo' drink ingredients, but when used in moderation, you can get two great things from them - flavor and color. Especially when you put a ton of rum with them.

In this case, we're using two of our favorite rums from our Tikitober event last October, both from Papa's Pilar. Like with many Tiki Drinks, we're using more than one rum, getting signature flavors from each. 

This drink is not as sweet as it looks and it packs one hell of a punch, with a total of 3.5 oz of booze. So please go easy on them. We wouldn't want you waking up in the middle of the night with green vomit or anything. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
jigger
strainer
tiki glass or tumbler

ingredients:

2 oz Papa's Pilar Light Rum
.5 oz Papa's Pilar Dark Rum
.5 oz Licor 43
.5 oz Midori
.5 oz blue curacao
1.5 oz fresh-squeezed oj
.5 oz fresh lime juice
slice of orange and lime for garnish


method:

Combine everything except your garnish in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 15 seconds to chill. Strain into your glass and fill the glass with crushed ice. Garnish and serve. 

Lower East Side

Second to an Old Fashioned, the Manhattan might just be the most well-known classic cocktail. Essentially an Old Fashioned with a little sweet vermouth in place of the sugar cube, it still contains the quintessential classic cocktail ingredient: bitters.

We recently got our hands on a bottle of Black Magic Spiced Rum and immediately started playing around with using it in cocktails. It's deep, dark spiced flavor makes it a natural for mixing and the first one out of the gate was this rum-based version of a Manhattan - what we're calling the Lower East Side.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Black Magic Spiced Rum
1 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters


method:

Add the rum, vermouth and bitters to your cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice and serve. If so inclined, garnish with a cherry to two.

Coconut Sake Cocktail

To say there's a ton of different types of sake is a massive understatement. Besides the typical differences, there's now flavored sakes that add even more variety to the mix.

Ty Ku Coconut Sake is a nigiri sake. Nigiri sakes are known for their cloudy appearance, where a small amount of rice content remains, giving a silky texture and mouthfeel. The flavor is subtle and not too sweet, but the tropical taste reminded us of warmer days during these winter months, so we figured we'd go with that inspiration on this tiki-like drink.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Ty Ku Coconut Sake
1 oz Sugar Island Coconut Rum
.5 oz blue curacao
1 oz fresh lemon juice
splash of soda
lice of lemon for garnish

 

method:

Combine sake, rum, lemon juice and blue curacao in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into collins glass with ice. Top with seltzer and garnish with slice of lemon.

 


Winter Vacation

There's something about a cold weather vacation. Be it a visit to a ski lodge or just a trip to see family up north, it's seeing how cold other people are that sometimes makes you feel a little better about your own winter blues. 

Well, this rum-based refresher might cure those blues, too. Made with Papa's Pilar 24 Dark Rum and a few other goodies, it might surprise you how much depth a rum drink can have.

We first enhanced the natural flavors of this rum with orange marmalade and Licor 43. Licor 43 is a liqueur with vanilla and spice notes, and it's pretty damn tasty. We had the pleasure of taking shots of it at our November 3st of the Month.

And just in case you needed a little extra warmth, we added a little splash of another one of our favorite back bar essentials: Ancho Reyes. Like the name would suggest, it's an ancho chili liqueur and it is damn fine. Not too spicy with a depth of toasty flavor, it's a great secret ingredient to many different cocktails.

 

equipment:

rocks glass
cocktail shaker
strainer

ingredients:

2 oz Papa's Pilar 24 Dark Rum
1 oz Licor 43
.5 oz Ancho Reyes
1 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
.5 oz orange marmalade

 

method:

Combine all ingredients in an ice-filled shaker and shake to chill. Strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice and garnish with a slice of orange.