Goblin Punch

When we first saw Deadhead Rum, we knew it was begging to be included in a Halloween cocktail! C'mon, it's a friggin' shrunken head bottle!

But what cool packaging sometimes hides is a lack-luster product...not the case with this stuff. Though you often think of Mexico as a place for tequila and mezcal, this Mexican rum has a unique flavor, with hints of vanilla and oak. 

It's got a robust flavor that is perfect for cocktails - including this silly little Halloween-inspired drink made green with Midori melon liqueur. 

So, give it a shake, pour it up and get your Halloween party going!

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Deadhead Rum
.5 oz Midori melon liqueur
.5 oz fresh lime juice
2 dashes grapefruit bitters
.5 oz simple syrup
grenadine, lime zest and cherry for garnish

method:

Combine rum, midori, lime, bitters and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into glass. Garnish with a lime zest-wrapped cherry and a few dribbles of grenadine on the rim.

Queztal

Tiki. Rum. Punch. Maple Syrup. These all go together, right? Right. We know the whole maple syrup thing sounds weird, and we weren't sure about it ourselves at first, but once we tried it we were hooked. Almost any cocktail is going to have some sort of sweet component to it. This is usually simple syrup, occasionally with a flavor included, but almost always made with basic white sugar. Don't get us wrong, we are big fans and users of simple syrup, but why not mix it up a little bit? 

To avoid any confusion, we are talking about real, pure maple syrup. If you use something in a plastic or woman-shaped bottle you're drink won't be right, as that is corn syrup, which is completely different. Real maple syrup will have a slightly thinner texture and a more subtle flavor than it's processed counterpart.

Enough about syrup, let's talk rum punch! While perfectly drinkable all summer long, this recipe will keep your tiki dreams alive well into the fall. The recipe below is for one drink, but is easily translated into a party punch that will serve many

Equipment

Cocktail shaker

Ingredients

1.5 oz Pyrat Rum
.5 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz orange juice
.5 oz pineapple juice
1 oz maple syrup
2 dashes bitters

Method

Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake until well mixed and strain into a glass with fresh ice.

Singapore Sling

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Originally created in a bar in Singapore 100 years ago and one of the oldest cocktail recipes still popular today, the Sling was adopted into tiki culture early on by Trader Vic (a pioneer of tiki drinks in the US) in a section of his drink menu titled "Drinks I Have Gathered from the Four Corners of the Globe." This menu also included such notables at the Pimm's Cup and Pisco Punch. Like it's cousin the Mai Tai, the Singapore Sling is probably most often thought of as a sweet, red drink full of rum that you enjoy at the hibachi grill, rather than the complex, tart, slightly bitter gin based cocktail it actually is. If anything, the Singapore Sling stands as the least saccharine tiki drink popular today, with all sweetness imparted by juice and the booze itself.

The famed mixologist D.A. Embury once said that "Of all the recipes published for [this drink] I have never seen any two that were alike." This one is based on one of the commonly accepted "original" recipes, but made it a little more modern and easy to make at home.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Cocktail strainer
Hurricane-style glass

Ingredients:

1.5 oz london dry gin
.5 oz Benedictine
.5 oz Cherry Heering (or cherry brandy)
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz pineapple juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
club soda

Method:

Fill shaker with ice. Combine gin, Benedictine, Cherry Heering, lime juice, pineapple juice, and bitters. Shake vigorously. Fill hurricane glass with fresh ice and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with fresh fruit. 



Penicillin Villain

Some flavors are just simply comforting. They may remind you of a certain memory or time in your life, or they might just make you feel good and safe and warm. For us; vanilla, honey, ginger, and lemon recall days of mom helping us feel better for whatever reason. Of course nowadays cocktails have the same effect, so why not mix it all up in a glass? Instant warm fuzzies!

We think its great that so many people in Nashville are making great products these days, and we love using them as often as possible. One such product is Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey from our good friends at SPEAKeasy Spirits Distilling. Smooth rye whiskey with a delicious vanilla flavor, Pennington's makes a great shot, and also a great cocktail. We've added some other complimentary flavors and come up with some serious comfort in a glass.

Equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer
rocks glass
lemon twist for garnish

Ingredients:

1.5 oz Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey
.5 oz Barsmith Honey Ginger Cocktail Syrup
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes lemon bitters

Method:

Combine all ingredients in cocktail mixing glass with ice. Stir with bar spoon until well mixed and very cold. Strain into rocks glass with fresh ice and garnish with lemon twist.

Rosemary's Baby

When you have great bourbon, it's important to not overdo it on the cocktail. And Elijah Craig is pretty great bourbon.

Named for Reverend Elijah Craig, who discovered the process of making true Kentucky whiskey when he stored his wares in barrels that had been charred in a fire. 

For this cocktail, we went with a spin on a classic Old Fashioned - but with a little herby goodness thanks to the rosemary simple syrup. To make it at home, start with a cup of water and a cup of sugar. Bring them to a boil and stir to dissolve. As soon as you remove it from the heat, add three sprigs of rosemary and let it steep for at least 30 minutes before straining. Once made, it will keep in the fridge for weeks. 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Elijah Craig Small Batch
.5 oz rosemary simple syrup
dash orange bitters
garnish with orange peel and rosemary sprig

method:

Combine everything but your garnish in your cocktail mixing glass and add ice. Stir to chill and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Add the orange and rosemary garnish and serve.

Fig and Fox

Though it technically can't be called Scotch, Copper Fox Rye Whiskey is made with a generous amount of smoked malt, giving it a smoky flavor similar to Scotch, but with the spice of a great rye whiskey. 

Copper Fox Rye Whiskey is one of the many amazing brands joining us for Best of the Barrel. Hailing from Virginia, the folks at Copper Fox Distillery spent a lot of time in Scotland studying the art and science behind making Scotch. The brought this knowledge to their distillery and now make and distribute their products around the country.

For this cocktail, we wanted to play off of the smoky flavor of the Copper Fox Rye and round it out with rich flavors from the fig jam, port wine and black walnut bitters. But it's the acidity of the lemon juice that really sets this one of. Without it, it would be just sweet and smoky. With it, it's a perfectly-balanced (if we do say so ourselves) cocktail.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

Ingredients 

1.5 oz Copper Fox Rye Whiskey
2 tsp fig jam
.5 oz lemon
.5 oz port wine
2 dash black walnut bitters
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine the booze, lemon juice, fig jam, port wine and bitters in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake it vigorously to chill and incorporate the flavors of the jam. Double strain to remove particles into your chilled glass. Express the oils from the lemon peel into the cocktail and place on the edge of the glass to garnish.

Tennessiki

Tiki drinks have made a huge comeback in the world of cocktails, and you won't hear any complaints from us! What's not to love about fruity, fun drinks with exotic ingredients? Not to mention all of the cool, kitschy glassware and garnishes that come along with tiki! While some people may think that tiki drinks are all sweet, sugary concoctions that your too-tan aunt Linda drank by the pool, that actually couldn't be further from the truth. While little paper umbrellas and bright red cherry garnishes might appear from time to time, tiki drinks are most often crafted from tart, even bitter ingredients that highlight the small amount of sweet fruit included in the cocktail.

Of course, when one thinks tiki, they probably think rum. Tiki can be made with just about any spirit you want to include. There are very few rules to tiki; it is a state of mind more than anything! Of course our spin on tiki had to include a Tennessee element, so we thought why not use a little Tennessee whiskey instead of rum for that southern flair. Because fruit complements whiskey so well, tiki seemed only natural! Most of the fruit we use in this drink is tart, with only a little bit of sweet nuttiness coming from the amaretto. Although we may not be drinking this on a tropical island somewhere, this cocktail makes any day a day at the beach!

You could choose to make this as a shaken drink, but we opted to blend it up instead. Either way, it's a refreshing whiskey cocktail!

equipment:

blender
tiki glass

ingredients:

2 oz Clayton James Tennessee Whiskey
.5 oz amaretto liqueur
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.5 oz raspberry puree
.5 oz lime juice
1 oz orange juice
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
4-6 oz crushed ice

method:

Add all ingredients into the blend and process until smooth. Pour into glass and garnish with something frilly!

Cool Story, Bros.

Bartenders hear some of the most incredible stories. And perhaps few of the most lame stories. But the good bartenders will always pretend like it's a good one, regardless of how shitty the story may be. 

Some of the best booze also has great stories. Take Medley Bros. Bourbon, for instance. All you have to do is take one look at the label to know there's got to be a good story behind it. It is from Charles Medley and his son, Sam, who have been producing Wathen's Single Barrel for about 15 years now. Charles is the son of Wathen Medley, who is second from the right of the five brothers pictured on the label. 

Bottled at 102 proof, it's got some bite to the booze and is great for making cocktails, so we worked it into a cocktail that could lower the overall proof, yet showcase the flavors it got from aging 4 years in a barrel. 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

Ingredients:

.75 oz Medley Brothers Bourbon
.75 oz Dolin Rouge Sweet Vermouth
.75 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao
.25 oz Brandy
4 dashes Angostura Bitters
2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters
strip of orange zest for garnish

method:

Combine all ingredients (except the garnish of course) in a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into your chilled glass. express the oils from the peel into the cocktail and place on the rim to garnish. 

'Nilla & Nut Old Fashioned

Waaaaay back in August of 2014 we kicked off this adventure we call 3st of the Month with a little more than 200 friends on the 3rd floor of Acme Feed & Seed in downtown Nashville. We had a loose 'anything goes' theme of "Booze 101" and had about 12 different tables of products. 

One of those first tables belonged to a new local product, Pennington's Strawberry Rye Whiskey. It's got the spice of a great rye whiskey, but with natural strawberry flavors. It was a hit. 

But here we are one year later getting ready for our big anniversary party (and we're heading back to Acme), and we're not the only ones that have been busy this year. Pennington's is coming back with not one - but two - new flavors! Just like the original Strawberry Rye, their new Vanilla Rye and Peach Apricot Rye have the spice you expect from rye whiskey, but with natural flavors that make them a blast for creating cocktails... and they're pretty good in shots. Even better, though they are sweetened, they have just enough sugar to make them go down easy (about half the sugar of that 'sphere of flame' cinnamon whiskey).

For this one, we're playing around with the new Vanilla Rye. And it's soooo good!

equipment:

rocks glass
bar spoon

ingredients:

2 oz Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey
1 dash black walnut bitters
slice of orange

method:

This is an easy one - you can just build it in the glass! Start with a large cube of ice if you've got it. If you don't, that's fine. Just use a few regular cubes. Add in the booze and the bitters and stir it around for a minute or two to water things down a bit and toss in the orange slice before serving. 

Pirate Punch

We love a good Tiki drink. Scratch that. We love a great Tiki drink. 

But what makes a great one? It's a few things really. Obviously, you have to start with good booze. For this one we've used Shellback Rum. It comes in both a silver un-aged version and a tasty spiced rum. For the sake of simplicity, we made this with just the silver rum, but it would be even better with an ounce of each!

The second element you need is fresh fruit juices - and a variety of them ideally. And, finally, you need an element of spice. This can come in the form of a few dashes of bitters, a sprinkle of cinnamon or, in this case, a half ounce of Pimento Dram, an allspice liqueur. 

Because what really makes a good Tiki drink a great one is layers of flavor. Well, that and maybe a creative garnish or two. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
tiki cup (or any cup, really)

ingredients:

2 oz Shellback Silver Rum
1 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz fresh orange juice
1 oz pineapple juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz pimento dram (allspice liqueur)
2 dashes aromatic bitters
fresh fruit garnish

 

method:

Combine everything but the garnish in a cocktail shaker and shake the living daylights out of it to chill before straining into a glass with crushed ice. Garnish and serve. 

Orange Negroni

Gin is made for cocktails. 

You can shoot tequila straight, sip frozen vodka at dessert and drink whiskey on the rocks, but gin is made for cocktails. 

We were quickly reminded of that fact when we tasted Damrak Gin for the first time. With a flavor unlike any gin we've ever tasted (and we've tasted a shit load of gin), Damrak turns down the juniper and turns up the citrus. Orange, to be exact. It's a mandatory 'must' for any gin lover - or even a gin hater for that matter, cause this stuff will turn them. But we shouldn't be surprised that it's so good. It comes from Bols - the same folks that make Bols Genever. They've been making spirits since 1575, so it's pretty safe to say they know their shit.

To play up the natural orange flavor of Damrak, we've added just a couple dashes of orange bitters to the classic Negroni recipe. Try it. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Damrak Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters
twist of orange peel for garnish.


method:

Combine the spirits and bitters in your mixing glass. Fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a pre-chilled rocks glass and add fresh ice. Garnish by expressing the oils of the orange zest into the cocktail before dropping it into the glass.

Lavender Ramos Gin Fizz

There's essentially two types of "gin fizz" cocktails. Those with cream and those without. Both have egg white and both are delicious, but you'll be amazed at how different they are. 

The Ramos Gin Fizz is a classic New Orleans cocktail that was invented in the 1880s by Henry Ramos. The original instructions called for 12 minutes of shaking time - needless to say, there were some seriously sore arms among those bartenders.

While we're not going to shake this thing for 12 minutes, it does require some serious shaking. The key to making it work is shaking twice. First, a dry shake without ice to help emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air and second, a shake with ice to add even more air and chill the cocktail. Both of these should be downright violent shakes, each lasting well over a minute. 

To make this unique, we're adding a little lavender bitters. A common ingredient that appears in gins, lavender really sets this off. If you don't have lavender bitters, just make it without - it will still be a damn good drink. You'll want to use a good, strongly-flavored gin like Edinburgh Gin for this one so the flavors come through the egg white and cream.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Edinburgh Gin
.75 oz heavy cream
.75 oz simple syrup
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 egg white
3-5 drops orange flower water
1 dash lavender bitters
1.5 oz club soda, chilled
a few dried lavender buds for garnish (optional)


method:

Add all ingredients except seltzer and garnish to a cocktails shaker (without ice!) and dry shake for at least one minute. When your arm gets tired, switch sides and shake again. When you think you're done, you're not...keep shaking. Then add ice and shake again...hard. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you're done.

Double-strain into a chilled collins glass and let settle for minute before topping with club soda. Sprinkle a few lavender buds on top.

Greenhouse

Yeah, yeah, yeah. You probably get tired hearing us RAVE about the spirits we use. That's because we use good shit. 

Our goal when we started 3st of the Month was to turn people on to stuff they may have never had before and reintroduce them to things they should be drinking more often. Over the past year we've had dozens of amazing top-shelf spirits, wine and beer join us on our adventure. Every now and then we're lucky to have them back more than once.

Art in the Age is the perfect example of why we set out to do this whole 3st thing in the first place. This stuff is so good it can't be categorized or grouped with any other spirit. Made with organic ingredients, they craft creative infused spirits like ROOTSNAPSAGE and RHUBARB Tea. SAGE is a hell of a lot more complex than the name would suggest. It's kinda like a "garden gin," made with sage, rosemary, fennel, thyme, sumac, dandelion and angelica. Though it's lacking the key ingredient to technically make it a gin (juniper), we're happy they're coming back to join us for Juniper June.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz Art in the Age SAGE
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.75 oz Lillet Blanc
dash aromatic bitters
sprig of rosemary for garnish

method:

Add the spirits and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into a pre-chilled glass. Garnish with rosemary.

Bijou

Here's one to file away for the 'random useless knowledge' category should you ever be on Jeopardy. 

Another classic gin cocktail, the Bijou translates to jewel in French. Why you ask? Because it combines three spirits, each representing a different jewel - gin for diamond, vermouth for ruby and Chartreuse for emerald. Pretty cool, huh?

The drink dates way back to the 1880s when it was first mentioned in Harry Johnson’s 1882 Bartender’s Manual. It's another example of how sweet vermouth and gin go hand-in-hand but it's a intensely-flavored cocktail, thanks in part to the addition of the Chartreuse.

For this one, we've grabbed our bottle of Abernathy Gin. Made here in TN, it's made using a vapor infusion technique and a special blend of nine botanicals including juniper, coriander, cassia, citrus peels and pecans to create a New American craft gin, with less intense flavor than the traditional London Dry Gins.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

1 oz Abernathy Gin
1 oz sweet vermouth
1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 dash orange bitters
strip of orange zest to garnish


method:

Start by chilling your cocktail glass. Add the booze and bitters to your mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into your glass and garnish with orange zest.

Martinez

Often thought of as the 'father' to the infamous gin martini, the Martinez may just be more like a cousin than a father. It uses sweet vermouth (instead of dry) and few other extra ingredients that differentiate it from it's clear relative. It's true origins are a bit of a mystery.

For the educated drinker, you might also see a resemblance to the Manhattan, which mixes bourbon/whiskey with sweet vermouth. 

Stories abound about the true origin, but really who gives a shit when the drink is this good? 

The great thing about gin is the variety. From one brand to the next, you'll find different proprietary recipes of botanicals, different base spirits and methods of distillation and even different methods of infusing those botanicals. One gin that we've grown pretty damn fond of is Uncle Val's. Actually, we should say three gins, because Uncle Val's produces three distinct varieties - Botanical, Restorative and Peppered - all of which will be served up at Juniper June.

For this version of the Martinez, we're using the Uncle Val's Restorative Gin, made with the classic mix of juniper and gin botanicals, with the addition of cucumber and rose. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Uncle Val's Restorative Gin
1.5 oz Carpano Antica (sweet vermouth)
1 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
2 dashes orange bitters
wist of lemon zest for garnish

 

method:

Start by chilling your glass. This is essential for any cocktail, especially one that you're serving without ice. Add the Uncle Val's Restorative Gin, Carpano Antica, Luxardo and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into your chilled glass. Garnish with lemon twist. 

 


Big Gin Martini

At the risk of pissing off some purists, we're going to go ahead and say it. A martini should be made with GIN.

Not only should it be made with gin, you should actually put a good bit of vermouth in there. That's right, none of this 'vermouth atomizer' bullshit. Pour it in.

The final myth we need to dispel (thanks to good ol' 007) is that a martini should always be stirred. Shaking it will only further water it down, losing the flavor of the gin. Speaking of flavorful gin...

Distilled and bottled in Seattle, Washington, Big Gin is a gin-lover's gin. Packed with botanicals, it sings with both the flavors of Traditional English gin (juniper, coriander, bitter orange) and modern flavor notes from Tasmanian pepperberry and grains of paradise, the peppery seeds of a member of the ginger family. So, in order to play off the existing flavors of this great gin, we added just a touch of lemon bitters. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
martini glass

ingredients:

3 oz Big Gin
1.5 oz dry vermouth
1 dash lemon bitters
lemon twist for garnish

method:

Start by chilling your glass by placing it in the freezer or filling with crushed ice. Add the gin, vermouth and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass. Add ice and stir to chill for about 15-20 seconds. Strain into your chilled martini glass and garnish with the lemon twist.


Stretch Limo

There's no shortage of unique gins on the market. These days the variety can be overwhelming. But if we had to suggest you experiment with something new, we suggest reaching for a Genever. 

The predecessor to modern day gin, Genever (pronounced 'gin-KNEE-ver'), is made from a base of malt wine, most commonly a rye, wheat and corn distillate. Bols Genever is triple distilled in copper pot stills, that is then blended with a unique bouquet of traditional Genever botanicals (hops, cloves, anise, licorice, ginger, juniper amongst many others) and aged for at least 18 months.

But Bols has recently released a Barrel-Aged Genever, that is stored for more than two years in French limosin oak casks. This maturation process imparts a pale, golden color and rich, oaky flavor the genever. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Bols Barrel-Aged Genever
.75 oz Meletti Amaro
1 barspoon demerara simple syrup (equal parts demerara sugar and water)
1 dash Scrappys Cardamom Bitters
strip of lemon zest for garnish


method:

Combine all ingredients except lemon zest in a cocktail mixing glass and stir to chill. Strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Express oils from the lemon peel into the glass before dropping it into the cocktail to garnish.

Whack n' Unwrap

Gin. It's just so misunderstood. 

People often think of gin as the 'christmas tree' booze, but what they may not realize is how books are on the shelf of the gin library. From London Dry Gin to Genever to Botanical Gin, each one is essentially unique from the next. 

That has never been more true than with Damrak Gin. Though it does contain some of the typical juniper flavor (it is a gin, after all), what really stands out are the bright citrus flavors. An unmistakable orange flavor is predominant on the palate, making it quite the 'gateway' gin.

So when it came time to play with cocktails, it seemed only natural to pair the orange flavor of Damrak Gin with what else but chocolate. Yes, chocolate. Orange and chocolate are a match made in heaven and this cocktail is good enough to have a halo all on its own.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Damrak Gin
.5 oz Collins Cordials Cocoa Dark
.5 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
1 dash Scrappy's Chocolate Bitters
orange peel for garnish


method:

Add the Damrak Gin, cocoa liqueur, orange juice and bitters to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake for about 10 seconds to chill before straining into a pre-chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with twist of orange. 


Matcha Maker

We've been asked what makes a cocktail worthy of being on our website. It's pretty simple... knowing what it tastes like, would we order it in a bar? If the answer is "hell yes" it makes to the page. Despite the crazy color of this one, it's most definitely a hell yes.

Distilled from cacao (yes, that fruit that chocolate comes from), Solbeso has flavors reminiscent of brandy, rum, tequila and even grappa, yet it's none of those. For this reason, we've taken to seeing just how far we can stretch the surrounding ingredients and still get something worthy of sharing (we haven't failed yet). 

For this one, we've worked to compliment the flavors of Solbeso while also highlighting another current obsession: matcha green tea. Available here in Nashville at K&S World Market, it is a finely-ground powder of specially-grown green tea leaves, which results in a bright green hue from the chlorophyll. Packed with promises of health and wellness, it's a great way to add a little conscience to your drinking habit.

 

equipment

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Solbeso
.5 oz lemon juice
.75 oz simple syrup
1/4 tsp matcha green tea powder
2 dashes orange bitters
1/4 tsp orange flower water
strip of orange peel and edible flower petals for garnish (optional)


method:

Add the Solbeso and matcha green tea powder to your cocktail shaker and dry shake (without ice) for a few seconds to combine. Add lemon juice, simple syrup, bitters and orange flower water and fill with ice before shaking to chill. Double-strain into a cocktail glass, garnish and serve. 

Lime & Orange Tequila Jelly Shots

These aren't the Jell-o shots of your youth. Forget those little cups with grape, cherry, and lime vodka-spiked slurpers. These are some high-test, high-grade, high-class jelly shots! 

Made with pure, unflavored (and unsweetened) gelatin, the flavors of the Espolón Reposado and other top-notch ingredients shine through in two different layers, one made with fresh lime juice and the other with fresh-squeezed orange juice. 

Once made, you can slice them into bite-sized 'shots' and serve them with a side of kosher salt for dipping if desired. 

 

equipment:

saucepan
bowl
whisk
9" square pan

ingredients:

LIME LAYER
1/2 cup fresh-squeezed lime juice
1/2 cup simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
2 packages of unflavored gelatin (.5 oz total)
1/4 cup orange liqueur
3/4 cup Espolón Reposado
1/4 cup agave nectar

ORANGE LAYER
1/2 cup fresh-squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
2 packages of unflavored gelatin (.5 oz total)
1/4 cup orange liqueur
3/4 cup Espolón Reposado
4-6 dashes orange bitters


method:

You'll make one layer at a time, allowing the first to chill before adding the second. In a saucepan, add the juice and simple syrup. Sprinkle the gelatin over top of the liquid and allow it to absorb liquid before placing over low heat. Stir to combine until gelatin is completely dissolved. Remove from heat and add in remaining ingredients.

Pour the completed mixture into your pan, starting with your lime layer. Refrigerate for two hours or until set. Pour the orange layer on top and return to the refrigerator overnight.