Maple Leaf

Although we love our neighbors to the north, we have always presumed ourselves to be better makers of whiskey down here in Tennessee and Kentucky. Traditionally, Canada has produced sweet, mellow, easy-drinking whiskey (which they spell whisky-weird, eh?) that often comes in a purple velvet bag and lacks very many distinctive characteristics.  

Historically, Canadian whisky was made primarily from corn, with a small amount of rye added to impart a more traditional whisky flavor. This whisky was then blended over and over in order to be consistently light in both color and flavor. The fine folks at Forty Creek have made great strides to change our minds about whisky-from-the-north, and it seems to be working. They distill rye, barley, and corn separately to highlight the characteristics that each grain brings to the party, and then blend them all for aging in oak barrels. This process add fruitiness, spiciness, and a distinct nutty quality unique to their product. While their whisky is great straight, it is perfect in this take on the traditional whisky sour.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Forty Creek Canadian Whisky
.75 oz lemon juice
.5 oz maple syrup
2 bar spoons orange marmalade
1 egg white

method:

Add all ingredients to your cocktail shaker and shake, without ice. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you can add ice. Then cover the shaker and shake it again - hard. Double strain (using both your cocktail strainer and mesh strainer) to remove the bits of marmalade into your glass.

Ruby Red

In 1837, a young man from Ireland known for his remarkable whiskey-making skills, came to America with his family’s whiskey recipe that had been passed down for generations. Young Mr. McKenna settled in Kentucky and began producing whiskey at the distillery he founded in 1855 near Fairfield, KY. 

He was a stickler for aging his product and insisted the whiskey get proper aging in oak barrels prior to being sold to the public (this process was not as common back then). But, lucky for us, what he started still continues today, generations later. 

We decided we would take this tasty bourbon whiskey and make something classic - with a new spin. Instead of a classic sour, using lemon juice and egg white, we swapped out the lemon for ruby red. The extra sweetness and subtle bitterness of the grapefruit actually pairs quite well with the bourbon. The key, of course, is all about a proper two-step shake. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Henry McKenna Bourbon Whiskey
1 oz ruby red grapefruit juice
.5 oz Eli Mason Gomme Syrup
strip of orange zest and cherry for garnish

method:

Pour the booze, grapefruit juice, gomme syrup and egg white into your cocktail shaker. As with most egg white sours, you'll want to actually shake this cocktail twice. The first is what's called a 'dry shake,' without any ice. So go ahead and shake the shit out of it. Then fill with ice and shake like hell again. Strain it into a rocks glass with a couple fresh ice cubes, garnish and serve.

Clover Club 2.0

The original Clover Club cocktail pre-dates Prohibition and comes from a men's club in Philly of the same name that would meet regularly at a local hotel. One of the first published recipes 1917 was in The Ideal Bartender by Thomas Bullock and listed the recipe simply. "Fill large Bar glass full Fine Ice. 2 pony Raspberry Syrup. 2 jigger Dry Gin. 1 jigger French Vermouth. White of 1 Egg. Shake well; strain into Cocktail glass and serve." Over the years, the recipe has been published in many forms, often omitting the vermouth and adding fresh lemon. While most recipes call for raspberry syrup, we found one adapted from 1907's Drinks by Paul Lowe that uses raspberry jam.

But we're mixing this classic up just a bit by swapping out fresh raspberries in place of raspberry syrup or jam. The result is exceptional, if we do say so ourselves. But part of what makes this drink so tasty (besides the fresh raspberries) is the choice of gin. 

We're using Sipsmith Gin from London. It's a true London Dry Gin and the bold botanicals make it ideal for cocktails of all sorts. It's made with 10 botanicals from around the globe; Macedonian juniper berries, Bulgarian coriander seed, French angelica root, Spanish licorice root, Italian orris root, Spanish ground almond, Chinese cassia bark, Madagascan cinnamon, Sevillian orange peel and Spanish lemon peel. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Sipsmith London Dry Gin
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
3 fresh raspberries, plus one for garnish
1 bar spoon granulated sugar
egg white

 

method:

Start by placing three fresh raspberries in your cocktail shaker and add the bar spoon of sugar. Muddle to mash and release the juices of the raspberries. Add gin, lemon, simple syrup and egg white and cover. Dry shake (without ice) for at least a minute, shaking it violently to emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air. Add ice and shake very hard for another minute before double-straining into a chilled glass. Garnish with remaining raspberry.

 


Dry Gin Fizz

We've already shared a recipe for the Ramos Gin Fizz. This ain't that. 

The standard Gin Fizz has a history that dates back to the late 1880s when six versions of the "fizz" were included in Jerry Thomas' Bartender's Guide (the first cocktail book published...pretty cool stuff). The Gin Fizz grew in popularity, with many variations on the standard.

To make the basic gin fizz, you really only need four ingredients; gin, lemon, sugar and club soda. Once you start adding other ingredients like egg whites or cream, you have entirely new versions with different properties. An egg yolk makes a Golden Fizz, a whole egg makes a Royal Fizz, champagne in place of club soda makes a Diamond Fizz...and so on. This version is essentially a Silver Gin Fizz, but we've made it with something special - a gin like no other. 

St. George Spirits makes three distinct gins (available individually or as a set of three little bottles); Terroir Gin, Botanivore Gin and Dry Rye Gin. The latter, Dry Rye Gin, is the key to this Dry Gin Fizz. As the name might suggest, it starts with 100% pot-distilled rye, giving a base of spice and richness before then adding six botanicals. Heavy on juniper, it also includes black peppercorn, caraway, coriander, grapefruit peel, lime peel - all of which were selected to compliment the juniper. It's a gin-lover's gin. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins or fizz glass

ingredients:

2 oz St. George Dry Rye Gin
1 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
1 egg white
1.5 oz club soda, chilled


method:

The key to this cocktail is a dry shake (without ice) to emulsify the egg white and incorporate air into the cocktail. So start by adding the gin, lemon, simple and egg white to your cocktail shaker. Cover and shake it HARD for a minimum of one minute. When you think you're done shaking...you're not. Shake it some more. Then add ice and shake it again...until your arm wants to fall off. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into your glass. Let settle for a few seconds before adding your club soda. 

Lavender Ramos Gin Fizz

There's essentially two types of "gin fizz" cocktails. Those with cream and those without. Both have egg white and both are delicious, but you'll be amazed at how different they are. 

The Ramos Gin Fizz is a classic New Orleans cocktail that was invented in the 1880s by Henry Ramos. The original instructions called for 12 minutes of shaking time - needless to say, there were some seriously sore arms among those bartenders.

While we're not going to shake this thing for 12 minutes, it does require some serious shaking. The key to making it work is shaking twice. First, a dry shake without ice to help emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air and second, a shake with ice to add even more air and chill the cocktail. Both of these should be downright violent shakes, each lasting well over a minute. 

To make this unique, we're adding a little lavender bitters. A common ingredient that appears in gins, lavender really sets this off. If you don't have lavender bitters, just make it without - it will still be a damn good drink. You'll want to use a good, strongly-flavored gin like Edinburgh Gin for this one so the flavors come through the egg white and cream.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Edinburgh Gin
.75 oz heavy cream
.75 oz simple syrup
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 egg white
3-5 drops orange flower water
1 dash lavender bitters
1.5 oz club soda, chilled
a few dried lavender buds for garnish (optional)


method:

Add all ingredients except seltzer and garnish to a cocktails shaker (without ice!) and dry shake for at least one minute. When your arm gets tired, switch sides and shake again. When you think you're done, you're not...keep shaking. Then add ice and shake again...hard. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you're done.

Double-strain into a chilled collins glass and let settle for minute before topping with club soda. Sprinkle a few lavender buds on top.

Tan Lady

The original classic cocktail White Lady, is made with gin, cointreau, lemon and egg white. Don't let the fu-fu name fool you. While she make look delicate, this is one strong woman.

Depending on who you ask, the cocktail was first created in either 1919 at Ciro's Club in London, who originally made it with creme de menthe and later replaced that with gin. Others claim it was created at the famous Savoy Hotel in London in 1930. Either way, it's really good.

When we first tried Bourbon Barreled Big Gin, we were blown away (as referenced by how little is left in the bottle in this photograph!). There are a few barrel aged gins on the market (three of which will be served at Juniper June), but each is distinct thanks to the base gin and the types of barrels used. Big Gin is obviously (as the name implies) aged in bourbon barrels. It's light amber color hints at the woody notes in the flavor profile. It's subtle - not fully woody like a whiskey - and the botanicals of the gin still shine through. 

Since we're using this gin, we figured we should embrace the color and go ahead and make this "Lady" tan. So a quick swap of Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao (one of our FAVORITE spirits to mix into cocktails) added even more hue to this tasty drink. Unlike most triple sec you'll find out there, this stuff actually has FLAVOR! It's made using a historical recipe that includes spices and peels of curacao oranges.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
champagne saucer

ingredients:

2 oz Bourbon Barreled Big Gin
.5 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 egg white


method:

Add all the ingredients to a cocktail shaker, fill it with ice and shake it to chill. Strain into a pre-chilled glass.