Singapore Sling

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Originally created in a bar in Singapore 100 years ago and one of the oldest cocktail recipes still popular today, the Sling was adopted into tiki culture early on by Trader Vic (a pioneer of tiki drinks in the US) in a section of his drink menu titled "Drinks I Have Gathered from the Four Corners of the Globe." This menu also included such notables at the Pimm's Cup and Pisco Punch. Like it's cousin the Mai Tai, the Singapore Sling is probably most often thought of as a sweet, red drink full of rum that you enjoy at the hibachi grill, rather than the complex, tart, slightly bitter gin based cocktail it actually is. If anything, the Singapore Sling stands as the least saccharine tiki drink popular today, with all sweetness imparted by juice and the booze itself.

The famed mixologist D.A. Embury once said that "Of all the recipes published for [this drink] I have never seen any two that were alike." This one is based on one of the commonly accepted "original" recipes, but made it a little more modern and easy to make at home.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Cocktail strainer
Hurricane-style glass

Ingredients:

1.5 oz london dry gin
.5 oz Benedictine
.5 oz Cherry Heering (or cherry brandy)
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz pineapple juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
club soda

Method:

Fill shaker with ice. Combine gin, Benedictine, Cherry Heering, lime juice, pineapple juice, and bitters. Shake vigorously. Fill hurricane glass with fresh ice and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with fresh fruit. 



Scorpion Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Now this is our idea of a drink! We've all had the ubiquitous Long Island Iced Tea before, (Just admit it. Its ok you were young...) and we have the Scorpion Bowl to thank. While most Tiki drinks were actually invented by a handful of guys in the United States, the Bowl is based on the idea of "communal drinks," which was a part of South Sea drinking custom. The Polynesians knew there was nothing quite like sharing a giant bowl of booze with their friends!

For this drink, you will need the vessel known as a scorpion bowl or tiki bowl. These are available in a range of options and prices. Other than buying online, you will probably have to keep your eyes peeled at flea markets or antique stores to find one. If you do find one grab it! They aren't all that common in the wild, but otherwise easy to buy with your trusty computer. Traditionally decorated with demons to guard your drink, they can also be found covered with palm trees, hula girls, and other South Pacific imagery. Another feature might be a volcano in the center of the bowl. Trust us, get the one with the volcano if you can, the added theatrics are well worth it. 

The easy association to make is between tiki drinks and rum, but actually a wide range of spirits are used to create these libations. Remember these cocktails were invented by Americans who had access to all sorts of ingredients. That is why you will find things like gin, cognac, sherry, and curaçao included. Our Scorpion Bowl recipe is actually quite easy to make, so invite a few friends and lets get started.

Equipment:

Scorpion Bowl

Ingredients:

3oz london dry gin
3 oz light rum
3 oz brandy
3 oz fresh orange juice
1.5 oz orgeat syrup
1.5 oz fresh lemon juice
1.5 oz amontillado sherry

for the volcano:
2 oz 151-proof rum
ground cinnamon

Method:

Fill Scorpion Bowl with ice. Add gin, rum, brandy, orange juice, orgeat, lemon juice, and sherry to bowl and stir to combine. Fill volcano with 151 rum and carefully set on fire before serving. Toss pinches of cinnamon into fire to create a crackling, fireworks effect.

Serves 2-4 people

The Best Gimlet Ever

If you're like us, you've probably had a Gimlet somewhere in your drinking history...and you were not that impressed. Too often they're either WAY to tart, too sweet or honestly just not that delicious. Well, news flash... you haven't had this gimlet.

You'll find recipes that call for Rose's lime juice. Don't use it. While that stuff might have a place in some cocktails, it does not belong in this one. Instead, follow the easy recipe at the bottom of this post to make your own lime cordial with just lime zest and simple syrup. You can thank us later.

As for the gin, we reached for good ol' Plymouth Gin on this one because a classic cocktail deserves a classic gin. They've been making it since 1793, so you know they have to be doing something right! It's a unique, protected style of gin that only they make. Go get some.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Plymouth Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.75 oz lime cordial (see easy recipe below)
slice of lime for garnish


method:

Place your glass in the freezer to get it ice cold. Add your gin, lime juice and lime cordial to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Give it a good, spirited shake and strain into your chilled glass before dropping in the slice of lime to garnish. 

lime cordial 

1 lime, washed
4 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)

Using a microplane grater, remove all the zest from the lime. Add the lime zest to your simple syrup, stir to combine and let it sit at room temperature for 15-20 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh strainer, pressing the remaining zest to get every damn drop of deliciousness. Refrigerate until needed.

Negroni

As we've stated before, we're pretty happy that Juniper June just happens to fall smack dab in the middle of Negroni Week. This celebration of the classic cocktail takes place in bars across the world, each offering a portion of the sales of every Negroni cocktail to the charity of their choice. 

Though the true origin of the classic Negroni is unknown, many think that it was first served at a cafe in Florence Italy in 1919. The story goes that a customer asked to 'stiffen' an Americano (vermouth, Campari and soda water) but using gin in place of the soda. The fad caught on and the Negroni family of Italy started producing a ready-made version of the cocktail, Antico Negroni.

Regardless of the history, the Negroni is the definition of balance, with the bitterness of the Campari, the sweetness of the vermouth and the boozyness of the gin in perfect harmony.

And while you're welcome to make a Negroni with any gin you wish, we've become kinda partial to Bulldog Gin from London. It's a London Dry Gin with spin - adding a few surprise botanicals in addition to the juniper and coriander that are commonplace among gins. Most notably, this includes lavender, lotus leaves and 'dragon eye,' most commonly known as longan, a relative of the lychee fruit.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
rocks glass
ice ball maker (optional)

ingredients:

1.5 oz Bulldog Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
strip of orange zest for garnish


method:

Add the Bulldog Gin, Campari and sweet vermouth to a cocktail mixing glass. Add ice and stir to chill. How long? A good gauge is feel the glass as you stir. Once it becomes ice cold, you know the drink is ready. Strain the cocktail into a chilled rocks glass and add an ice sphere or single large ice cube. Express the oils from the orange peel into the cocktail, run the oily side along the rim of the glass and drop it in. 


The Ford Negroni

Instead of the traditional recipe with equal parts gin, sweet vermouth and Campari, this extra-boozy version calls for a heavier hand of gin. Really good gin, in fact.

We're using another one of our favorites from Juniper June, Fords Gin

Fords Gin is distilled in London at Thames Distillers, and is a collaboration between 8th generation Master Distiller Charles Maxwell and Simon Ford of The 86 Co. The mix of 9 botanicals starts with a traditional backbone base of juniper & coriander seed that's balanced with citrus (bitter orange, lemon & grapefruit peels), floral (jasmine flower & orris) and spice (angelica & cassia). The botanicals are steeped for 15 hours before distillation in 500 liter stills. The result is a gin custom-made for mixing into cocktails. 

So let's go ahead and make this one!

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Fords Gin
1 oz Campari
1 oz Carpano Antica (sweet vermouth)
dash of grapefruit bitters
lemon peel for garnish


method:

Combine Fords Gin, Campari, Carpano Antica and grapefruit bitters in a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Garnish with lemon peel.


Gin Daiquiri

Yeah, of course we all know a daiquiri is supposed to be made with rum. But who gives a shit? We don't, that's for sure.

We recently gathered in a cocktail-fest of sorts, making all kinds of drinks with the incredible lineup of spirits that are joining us for Juniper June.

We're all big fans of the original daiquiri, so it only made sense to try one made with gin. But not just any gin.

You see, many gins have a very strong juniper flavor that would overwhelm this cocktail. Hendrick's Gin, on the other hand, is what we call a 'gateway gin,' with subtle flavors of cucumber and rose. It's smooth and delicious. Just like this cocktail. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Hendrick's Gin
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.25 oz demerara simple syrup (equal parts demerara sugar and water)
.25 Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
fresh mint for garnish


method:

Combine the Hendrick's Gin, lime juice, simple and Luxardo in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Princeton Shadow

If you ask us, port wine doesn't get enough love as an ingredient in cocktails. It's all about vermouth, vermouth, vermouth! But this fortified wine can add exceptional depth to cocktails when used with spirits that can stand up the rich flavor. 

We found just the spirit to do that. Corsair Barrel Aged Gin

A local favorite distillery here in Nashville, Corsair has won awards and praise all over the world for their experimental distillations. A few years back, they decided age their already delicious gin in charred oak barrels that they had used to age their spiced rum. The result? Incredible. The process not only mellowed the flavors of the gin but added spice and complexity that make this gin the perfect balance to the port in this spin on a classic Princeton cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Corsair Barrel Aged Gin
1 oz port wine
lemon zest for garnish


method:

Add the gin and port to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Stir it to chill before straining into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Express the oils from the lemon peel into the cocktail and drop into the glass for garnish.

Big Gin Martini

At the risk of pissing off some purists, we're going to go ahead and say it. A martini should be made with GIN.

Not only should it be made with gin, you should actually put a good bit of vermouth in there. That's right, none of this 'vermouth atomizer' bullshit. Pour it in.

The final myth we need to dispel (thanks to good ol' 007) is that a martini should always be stirred. Shaking it will only further water it down, losing the flavor of the gin. Speaking of flavorful gin...

Distilled and bottled in Seattle, Washington, Big Gin is a gin-lover's gin. Packed with botanicals, it sings with both the flavors of Traditional English gin (juniper, coriander, bitter orange) and modern flavor notes from Tasmanian pepperberry and grains of paradise, the peppery seeds of a member of the ginger family. So, in order to play off the existing flavors of this great gin, we added just a touch of lemon bitters. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
martini glass

ingredients:

3 oz Big Gin
1.5 oz dry vermouth
1 dash lemon bitters
lemon twist for garnish

method:

Start by chilling your glass by placing it in the freezer or filling with crushed ice. Add the gin, vermouth and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass. Add ice and stir to chill for about 15-20 seconds. Strain into your chilled martini glass and garnish with the lemon twist.


Aviation

Originally created in the early 1900's the first written recipe of this classic cocktail came in 1916. 

Likely named for the light sky blue hue it gets from crème de violette (violet liqueur), it's basically a variation on a gin sour, using one of our favorite ingredients, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur as the sweetener. 

Since crème de violette was once often difficult to come by, there's been variations of the recipe floating around for years without it. These days, that's a crock of shit, as you can find Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette at most liqueur stores. It has a intense earthy flavor, so know that a little goes a very long way. 

But despite the light blue color, the real star of this cocktail is the GIN! Most recipes call for a dry London-style gin. Well, we have just the gin for that! Sipsmith is a craft distiller in London and makes a mighty fine London Dry Gin. They're one of many incredible gins joining us for Juniper June and we can't wait for folks to give them a try!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz Sipsmith London Dry Gin
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.25 oz Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice


method:

Start by pre-chilling your coupe glass. In a cocktail shaker, add all ingredients and fill with ice. Cover and shake to chill before straining into your chilled glass. 

Foreward March

Ahh, spring! Finally.

Spring conjures up images of budding trees, fresh green grass and...allergies. But we digress. 

What spring means when it comes to cocktails is putting aside the whiskey and bourbon and picking up some lighter spirits like gin. Corsair Gin is one of our favorites. Made right here in Nashville, it's won a shit-ton of awards - and for good reason. It's made in small batches in a copper pot still with a somewhat unusual blend of botanicals. This makes the end result lighter than many more traditional gins with a citrusy finish. 

And besides being delicious on its own, Corsair Gin is an excellent mixing partner in cocktails, as its subtle flavor does not overwhelm other ingredients. 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Corsair Gin
1 oz Chartreuse
.5 oz Eli Mason Gomme Syrup (or simple syrup)
1.5 oz chilled Champagne


method:

Add gin, Chartreuse and gomme syrup to a cocktail mixing glass before filling with ice. Stir for 20-30 seconds to chill. Strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice and top with chilled champagne.

Brother Raphael

With Bitter Lovers around the corner, we've been talking about amari a lot lately. Though technically not an amaro, Bonal Gentiane Quina shares many traits with its Italian counterparts. A French aperitif wine, Bonal was created in 1865 by a monk named Brother Raphael and is commonly known as "ouvre l’appétit" or the key to the appetite. Aperitifs are similar to Italian amaris in that they often infuse bitter botanicals into a base of alcohol. In the case of Bonal, this base is a fortified wine called Mistelle. Unlike typical wines which result from the fermentation of grape juice, Mistelle is made by adding alcohol (often brandy) to the juice of the crushed grapes instead of fermenting. Since the fructose of the juice has not been converted to alcohol, Mistelle has a characteristic fresh fruit flavor. But Mistelle alone would not be Bonal. The infusion of gentian root, cinchona (quinine) and herbs of the Grand Chartreuse mountains give it a characteristic flavor unlike many other aperitifs you'll find today. 

With one of the key ingredients of Bonal being cinchona bark, the base of modern day quinine (tonic) water, the first thing we reached for was gin. You know, gin and tonic? The gin from our friends at Corsair is incredible and, sure enough, it paired perfectly with Bonal, especially when lightened to a effervescent cocktail with a little soda water.

Okay, enough talk already. . . Let's make the damn drink!

 

equipment:

collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Bonal Gentiane-Quina
1 oz Corsair Gin
2.5 oz seltzer
long strip of lemon peel


method:

Fill a Collins glass with ice and build the cocktail in the glass, starting with Corsair Gin, adding Bonal and seltzer. Stir lightly to distribute and garnish with the strip of lemon zest, circled inside the glass.

London Holiday

As we've discussed before, no two gins are alike. Each one is unique in their blend of botanicals, imparting distinct flavors and characteristics to the finished spirit. Boodles Gin is a British-made "London Dry Gin," yet it's not made with any citrus as many other London-style gins are. 

Believe it or not, most "London" gins are not even made in London. The term refers to several factors, one of which is the requirement that the botanicals be infused through distillation (some gins are simply flavored) and that it cannot contain more than 0.1 grams of sugar per liter of the finished product, hence the dry nature of London-style gins. 

Boodles is joining us for our January 3st of the Month, so we've been having fun mixing up some cocktails. With Christmas just around the corner, we figured it would be nice to make something fitting for the season. We paired it up with our Cranberry Ginger Syrup (see the easy recipe here) and the result was pretty damn tasty if we do say so ourselves. Well, it looks like we just did say so.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
martini glass

ingredients:

2 oz Boodles Gin
2 oz fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice
1 oz Cranberry Ginger Syrup (recipe)


method:

Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake vigorously to chill for 10-15 seconds before straining into a chilled martini glass. If you really want to get festive, garnish it with a few cranberries.

Gin for the Win Cocktail

Gin. Likely the most misunderstood and under-appreciated booze out there today, well at least here in the South. 

There are many different varieties of gin, and each has its own flavor and profile. Some are significantly more fragrant and flavorful than others, with notes of juniper in the forefront. Others use botanicals like cucumber and rose to impart a more subtle flavor.

What's great about gin is that it has the mix-ability of a clear spirit and the complexity of a brown spirit. While we LOVE making cocktails with gin, a great gin really could simply be sipped neat or with single cube or two.

This simple cocktail takes Bols Genever Gin, made with the original 1820 recipe, and pairs it with a few pantry staples to create this slightly sweet and very delicious cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks or old fashioned glass

ingredients:

2 oz Bols Genever Gin
1 oz Cocchi Rosa
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 dash aromatic bitters
Luxardo cherries for garnish


method:

Combine all the spirits and lemon juice in the mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill for 15-20 seconds. Place 2-3 cubes in your rocks glass and strain cocktail into glass. Add dash of bitters on top and garnish with cherries.

Fogg Cutter

Don't let the frilly umbrella on this drink fool you - it's not for the weak of heart, or liver for that matter.

Made with 4 ounces of booze, including two different rums, gin and brandy, it actually tastes surprisingly approachable, due in part to the addition of pure almond extract. 

Created in the 1970's at New Orlean's Bali Hai At The Beach, it was misspelled with an extra "g" on fog - most likely to differentiate it from the original Trader Vic's version. Well, that or whoever named it had consumed one to many themselves!

 

Recipe adapted from Beachbum Berry Remixed: A Gallery of Tiki Drinks.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
tiki mug

ingredients:

2 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
1.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
1.5 oz turbinado simple syrup (recipe)
1 oz Ron Matusalem light rum
1 oz Ron Matusalem dark rum
1 oz brandy
1 oz gin
1 bar spoon almond extract
8 oz crushed ice
fresh mint for garnish

 

method:

Combine everything in a blender and blend on high speed for 5 seconds before pouring into glass and adding more crushed ice to fill. Garnish and serve.

Bali-Bali

As you likely know, tiki drinks have quite a history. While we won't get into all the details now, we will make this old-ass drink. Well, it's not that old...just from the 1950's. Okay, so maybe it is kinda old.

Originally from Bali Ha'i At The Beach in New Orleans, it's a great example of just how misleading a good tiki drink can be. All those cute and frilly garnishes make some folks think they're drinking a "fu-fu" drink meant for the ladies.

We have news for you - this drink is no fu-fu drink. It's packed with booze.

Like with all of our cocktails, we urge you to please drink responsibly. Especially when you have 4 ounces of booze in one cocktail!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
highball glass

ingredients:

1 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
1 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
1 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
1 oz dark Jamaican rum (such as Myers)
1 oz light Virgin Islands rum
1 oz gin
1 oz Cognac
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz Velvet Falernum
.5 oz passion fruit syrup (see our recipe here)
fresh fruit garnish

 

method:

Combine all ingredients with ice and shake well. Transfer unstrained into your glass and fill with additional ice if needed. Garnish and serve.

Violet Beauregarde Gin Cocktail

When you think of gin and crème de violette liqueur, you probably think of the classic Aviation cocktail. While we won't deny the delicious boozyness of the Aviation, that lonely bottle of crème de violette needs some other cocktails every now and then.

One of our favorite violet offerings is Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette. Made with a base spirit distilled from grapes and violet flowers from the Alps, it has an obviously floral flavor to it. But there is more than just flowers to the flavor. It is sweet, vegetal and slightly herbal. A little goes a very long way with cocktails, so use it sparingly - a bottle should last you for quite a while.

We've paired it with another obtuse bar staple: Velvet Falernum. Most often used in tropical tiki drinks, Falernum has a complex lime/spice/almond flavor profile.

Intended for sipping, we've made this cocktail with a spherical ice ball, so it will slowly melt while you take your time sipping little nips of this fragrant boozy beverage.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass
spherical ice ball (or large cube)

ingredients:

2 oz Prairie Organic Gin
.5 oz Crème de Violette 
.5 oz Velvet Falernum 
.5 oz dry vermouth
2 dashes grapefruit bitters
strip of grapefruit zest for garnish


method:

Chill your glass with ice while preparing cocktail. Fill your mixing glass with ice and add gin, crème de violette, falernum, vermouth and bitters. Stir for 20 or so seconds to chill. Place ice ball in your prepared rocks glass and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with grapefruit zest.


Garden Pickle Martini

If you're like us, the idea of intentionally enjoying a martini did not settle in until after those infamous college party days. Why would you actually want to taste the booze when you can smother it under layers of sugary juices and sodas and chug it as quickly as possible?

But eventually, we all grow up and realize that a good martini is not only an excuse to really savor good booze, but perhaps also an opportunity to get some veggies into your liquid diet. 

It was a good friend Anita in Charleston, SC who deserves the thanks in this case. The entire door of her refrigerator was full of little jars of pickled veggies - all with one purpose - garnishing a martini. Be it pickled 'dilly beans' or a jar of Tomolives (tasty little pickled green tomatoes), her supply of pickled veggies was matched only by the pickled livers of her guests. 

Speaking of guests...our 3st of the Month members had a chance to taste Prairie Organic Gin for themselves at our August 3st kickoff event. Unlike some gins, the flavors of Prairie are subtle with soft juniper notes. It's the perfect vehicle for a spin on a classic gin martini - aka pickled salad bar - if you ask us. Just be sure you're using dill/sour pickles, not sweet ones. 

 

Garden Pickle Gin Martini recipe from 3st of the Month

equipment:

cocktail shaker
bar spoon
strainer
martini glass

ingredients:

2 oz Prairie Organic Gin
.5 oz dry vermouth
1 bar spoon pickle juice
assorted pickled veggies and olives
sprig of fresh dill (optional)


method:

Start by chilling down your martini glass with ice. You need a good, cold glass for a martini - this is not optional. Then fill your shaker with ice and add the gin, vermouth and bar spoon of pickle juice. Cover and gyrate to chill. You don't want to shake it, as this will water down the flavors. Discard ice from martini glass and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with assorted pickled veggies and a sprig of dill.


Prairie Peach Cocktail

Here in Nashville, we're fortunate to have The Peach Truck, a great little business that brings the best damn peaches you've ever tasted straight from the farm in Georgia to Nashville. Sadly, peach season will come to an end in a couple weeks, so we figured we better take advantage of it while we still can!

We've paired the juicy peach with fresh basil and Prairie Organic Gin. Like many muddled fruit cocktails, this one is shaken to help further release the flavors. But after that, we like to strain it. This keeps the bits and pieces out of the cocktail, allowing you to just get the best part - the flavor.

 

Muddled peaches and basil pair with gin for the Prairie Peach Cocktail from 3st of the Month

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Prairie Organic Gin
.5 oz Peach Brandy
.5 oz Peachcello liqueur (or peach schnaps) 
2 dashes peach bitters
fresh peach
fresh basil
splash of club soda (optional)


method:

Add 2-3 basil leaves and 1/4 of a fresh peach to the bottom of your cocktail shaker. Muddle to release flavors before adding gin, brandy, peach liqueur and peach bitters. Fill with ice and shake vigorously to chill. Strain into chilled rocks glass with a few ice cubes and garnish with a slice of peach and bit of basil. If you prefer, top with a spash of club soda.

Lavender & Lemon

While some flower waters are easy to purchase, some are easy to make. Lavender water is essentially made with either a few drops of extract into water or, like we did, by steeping a tablespoon of organic (food quality) lavender blooms in boiling water for five minutes. The floral notes of lavender are a natural pairing with gin - making a little cocktail orgy of sorts. Trust us.

To help round out the flavors of this one, we've added a touch of fresh lemon for acidity and a little Eli Mason gomme syrup for sweetness and mouthfeel. Like with many boozy drinks, you want to stir this rather than shake it, as shaking will rapidly dilute the drink and the aeration from shaking can dull the flavor. With that in mind, we've also served this with an ice ball to add chill but cut down on the surface area that the drink comes in contact with. Ours was made from the spherical ice maker from the Whiskey Ice Co. in Dallas, Texas. We'll elaborate on the difference some day soon in our booze blog, but until then trust us when we say an ice ball maker is NOT the same as an ice ball mold, which produces inferior ice balls that crack and split (making the whole point of using one pointless if you ask us).

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
ice ball or large ice cube
rocks glass

ingredients:

2.5 oz Prairie Organic Spirits' Gin
.25 oz Eli Mason gomme syrup
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz lavender water
strip of lemon peel for garnish

 

method:

In a cocktail mixing glass with a 5-6 ice cubes, add the gin, gomme syrup, lemon juice and lavender water. Stir for 20-30 seconds to chill. Place ice ball in your chilled rocks glass and pour cocktail over the ice into the glass. Express oils from peel over glass and place in the drink. Sip and enjoy responsibly. 

Cucumber Tonic

Deliciously-simple Cucumber Tonic cocktail from 3st of the Month

Summertime is full of fresh veggies from the garden. While not all of them work well in cocktails, cucumbers are an incredibly versatile addition to many vodka, gin and even tequila drinks. Whether you're infusing the booze with a few slices of fresh cucumber or muddling some cucumber chunks directly in the glass, the bright flavors of cucumber really add some refreshment to summertime boozy cocktails.

Take the classic gin and tonic. By mashing a couple pieces of cucumber in the glass, this drink takes on a whole new dimension. It's made even better with use of Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic syrup. Like a lot of other syrups (i.e. ginger syrup), stocking your bar with a syrup like this one is great, as it means you can simply keep a supply of seltzer on hand and not have to have bottles of tonic water taking up valuable space in a bar. But as if that was not enough, the flavors of Jack Rudy's Small Batch Tonic are far superior to any bottled version you'll find. So, go ahead, give this one a try and you'll see how a few simple ingredients can make one damn good drink.

 

equipment:

mixing glass
muddler
bar spoon
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz gin
.75 oz Jack Rudy Small Batch Tonic 
3 slices fresh cucumber
4 oz seltzer
ice
slice of cucumber for garnish

 

method:

in the bottom of your mixing glass, muddle cucumber with gin to release flavors. Add tonic syrup and seltzer and stir to combine. Fill rocks glass with ice and pour cocktail into glass. Garnish with fresh cucumber and enjoy (responsibly, please).

 

Note: if you do not have access to Jack Rudy Tonic, you can simply substitute the seltzer and syrup with regular tonic water.