Barbacoa

As much as we love mezcal, it isn't necessarily the best spirit for mixing. It has a very strong, distinct smoky flavor, much like that of a scotch. That's probably why a mezcal is most often enjoyed neat or on the rocks with little more that a piece of lime. We here at 3st strive to bring you the best in cocktails, so we did a little experimenting with the stuff and came up with something that really highlights the flavors of mezcal, but also softens it with complements. Now we know you might be thinking "bell peppers in a cocktail?" And that is certainly a fair question. The campfire flavors of the mezcal don't lend themselves to sweetness very well, so we went the savory route. We used ginger and citrus to round out the drink. This drink ended up being quite popular at our recent Tikitober event, so we hope you'll try it out and enjoy it too!

Equipment

Cocktail shaker
Crushed ice
Muddler

Ingredients

1.5 oz Los Amantes Mezcal Reposado
1 oz ginger simple syrup
2-3 1 inch slices green bell pepper
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz fresh lime juice

Method

Muddle bell pepper and ginger syrup in cocktail shaker. Add ice cubes (not crushed) and remaining ingredients. Shake and strain over crushed ice. Garnish with a new piece of bell pepper.

Scorpion Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Now this is our idea of a drink! We've all had the ubiquitous Long Island Iced Tea before, (Just admit it. Its ok you were young...) and we have the Scorpion Bowl to thank. While most Tiki drinks were actually invented by a handful of guys in the United States, the Bowl is based on the idea of "communal drinks," which was a part of South Sea drinking custom. The Polynesians knew there was nothing quite like sharing a giant bowl of booze with their friends!

For this drink, you will need the vessel known as a scorpion bowl or tiki bowl. These are available in a range of options and prices. Other than buying online, you will probably have to keep your eyes peeled at flea markets or antique stores to find one. If you do find one grab it! They aren't all that common in the wild, but otherwise easy to buy with your trusty computer. Traditionally decorated with demons to guard your drink, they can also be found covered with palm trees, hula girls, and other South Pacific imagery. Another feature might be a volcano in the center of the bowl. Trust us, get the one with the volcano if you can, the added theatrics are well worth it. 

The easy association to make is between tiki drinks and rum, but actually a wide range of spirits are used to create these libations. Remember these cocktails were invented by Americans who had access to all sorts of ingredients. That is why you will find things like gin, cognac, sherry, and curaçao included. Our Scorpion Bowl recipe is actually quite easy to make, so invite a few friends and lets get started.

Equipment:

Scorpion Bowl

Ingredients:

3oz london dry gin
3 oz light rum
3 oz brandy
3 oz fresh orange juice
1.5 oz orgeat syrup
1.5 oz fresh lemon juice
1.5 oz amontillado sherry

for the volcano:
2 oz 151-proof rum
ground cinnamon

Method:

Fill Scorpion Bowl with ice. Add gin, rum, brandy, orange juice, orgeat, lemon juice, and sherry to bowl and stir to combine. Fill volcano with 151 rum and carefully set on fire before serving. Toss pinches of cinnamon into fire to create a crackling, fireworks effect.

Serves 2-4 people

Penicillin Villain

Some flavors are just simply comforting. They may remind you of a certain memory or time in your life, or they might just make you feel good and safe and warm. For us; vanilla, honey, ginger, and lemon recall days of mom helping us feel better for whatever reason. Of course nowadays cocktails have the same effect, so why not mix it all up in a glass? Instant warm fuzzies!

We think its great that so many people in Nashville are making great products these days, and we love using them as often as possible. One such product is Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey from our good friends at SPEAKeasy Spirits Distilling. Smooth rye whiskey with a delicious vanilla flavor, Pennington's makes a great shot, and also a great cocktail. We've added some other complimentary flavors and come up with some serious comfort in a glass.

Equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
cocktail strainer
rocks glass
lemon twist for garnish

Ingredients:

1.5 oz Pennington's Vanilla Rye Whiskey
.5 oz Barsmith Honey Ginger Cocktail Syrup
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes lemon bitters

Method:

Combine all ingredients in cocktail mixing glass with ice. Stir with bar spoon until well mixed and very cold. Strain into rocks glass with fresh ice and garnish with lemon twist.

Harvey Headbanger

A crisp, refreshing vodka cocktail is pretty hard to beat. Of course you need to start with the proper spirit, and we think that Reyka Vodka fits the bill perfectly. Made in Iceland, where people know their vodka, Reyka is made in small batches with pure arctic spring water, filtered through lava rocks, and distilled in one of the world's only Carter Head copper stills. And because it's Iceland, the entire distillery runs on geothermal energy from volcanoes! The resulting vodka is clean, pure, fresh, and mixes perfectly with just about anything. So let's make a drink with it!

Now we've all seen the tall, skinny bottle of bright yellow booze behind the bar, covered in dust, and wondered; what is that, what do you make with it, and who drinks it? The answers are Galliano, lots of things, and probably your grandparents long before you were born! You might have heard of the classic cocktail called a Harvey Wallbanger, which is basically a vodka-OJ with a splash of Galliano. With that inspiration, we made a modern cocktail suitable for all you drink snobs out there who would never dare order a screwdriver. (Don't worry that's us too)

Equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

Ingredients:

1.5 oz Reyka Vodka
.75 oz Galliano
.5 oz triple sec
.5 oz lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
3 dashes orange bitters

Method:

Combine all ingredients in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a cocktail glass.

Fig and Fox

Though it technically can't be called Scotch, Copper Fox Rye Whiskey is made with a generous amount of smoked malt, giving it a smoky flavor similar to Scotch, but with the spice of a great rye whiskey. 

Copper Fox Rye Whiskey is one of the many amazing brands joining us for Best of the Barrel. Hailing from Virginia, the folks at Copper Fox Distillery spent a lot of time in Scotland studying the art and science behind making Scotch. The brought this knowledge to their distillery and now make and distribute their products around the country.

For this cocktail, we wanted to play off of the smoky flavor of the Copper Fox Rye and round it out with rich flavors from the fig jam, port wine and black walnut bitters. But it's the acidity of the lemon juice that really sets this one of. Without it, it would be just sweet and smoky. With it, it's a perfectly-balanced (if we do say so ourselves) cocktail.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

Ingredients 

1.5 oz Copper Fox Rye Whiskey
2 tsp fig jam
.5 oz lemon
.5 oz port wine
2 dash black walnut bitters
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine the booze, lemon juice, fig jam, port wine and bitters in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake it vigorously to chill and incorporate the flavors of the jam. Double strain to remove particles into your chilled glass. Express the oils from the lemon peel into the cocktail and place on the edge of the glass to garnish.

Peach Puppy

Nothing goes with whiskey quite like fruit does, and summer's favorite fruit, the peach, might just go with whiskey better than any other. As summer comes to a close, we can relive its glory days with this sweet, refreshing, and easy cocktail. 

Like vodka, who's flavors are too numerous to count these days, more and more whiskey makers are branching out into flavors.  While some of these flavored spirits taste great all by themselves, they are especially well suited for mixing into cocktails. Bird Dog Peach Whiskey is no exception. With its peachy sweetness it makes for a nice, easy to take shot, as well as some damn fine summery cocktails. Here we've mixed it with Pennington's Vanilla Rye (made right here in Nashville!) and some sparkling soda water that will make you think of peach pie on a hot summer day.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Bird Dog Peach Flavored Whiskey
.5 oz Pennington’s Vanilla Rye Whiskey
.25 lemon juice
soda water
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine both whiskeys and the lemon juice in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Top with a splash of soda water, garnish with lemon zest and enjoy!

Maple Leaf

Although we love our neighbors to the north, we have always presumed ourselves to be better makers of whiskey down here in Tennessee and Kentucky. Traditionally, Canada has produced sweet, mellow, easy-drinking whiskey (which they spell whisky-weird, eh?) that often comes in a purple velvet bag and lacks very many distinctive characteristics.  

Historically, Canadian whisky was made primarily from corn, with a small amount of rye added to impart a more traditional whisky flavor. This whisky was then blended over and over in order to be consistently light in both color and flavor. The fine folks at Forty Creek have made great strides to change our minds about whisky-from-the-north, and it seems to be working. They distill rye, barley, and corn separately to highlight the characteristics that each grain brings to the party, and then blend them all for aging in oak barrels. This process add fruitiness, spiciness, and a distinct nutty quality unique to their product. While their whisky is great straight, it is perfect in this take on the traditional whisky sour.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Forty Creek Canadian Whisky
.75 oz lemon juice
.5 oz maple syrup
2 bar spoons orange marmalade
1 egg white

method:

Add all ingredients to your cocktail shaker and shake, without ice. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you can add ice. Then cover the shaker and shake it again - hard. Double strain (using both your cocktail strainer and mesh strainer) to remove the bits of marmalade into your glass.

Tennessiki

Tiki drinks have made a huge comeback in the world of cocktails, and you won't hear any complaints from us! What's not to love about fruity, fun drinks with exotic ingredients? Not to mention all of the cool, kitschy glassware and garnishes that come along with tiki! While some people may think that tiki drinks are all sweet, sugary concoctions that your too-tan aunt Linda drank by the pool, that actually couldn't be further from the truth. While little paper umbrellas and bright red cherry garnishes might appear from time to time, tiki drinks are most often crafted from tart, even bitter ingredients that highlight the small amount of sweet fruit included in the cocktail.

Of course, when one thinks tiki, they probably think rum. Tiki can be made with just about any spirit you want to include. There are very few rules to tiki; it is a state of mind more than anything! Of course our spin on tiki had to include a Tennessee element, so we thought why not use a little Tennessee whiskey instead of rum for that southern flair. Because fruit complements whiskey so well, tiki seemed only natural! Most of the fruit we use in this drink is tart, with only a little bit of sweet nuttiness coming from the amaretto. Although we may not be drinking this on a tropical island somewhere, this cocktail makes any day a day at the beach!

You could choose to make this as a shaken drink, but we opted to blend it up instead. Either way, it's a refreshing whiskey cocktail!

equipment:

blender
tiki glass

ingredients:

2 oz Clayton James Tennessee Whiskey
.5 oz amaretto liqueur
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.5 oz raspberry puree
.5 oz lime juice
1 oz orange juice
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
4-6 oz crushed ice

method:

Add all ingredients into the blend and process until smooth. Pour into glass and garnish with something frilly!

Forester Fire

If you follow along on our blog, you've probably seen that we love Ancho Reyes. It's the perfect way to add some heat to almost any cocktail, regardless of the base spirit.

In this case, we've started with another one of our favorites, Old Forester 86 proof. With a lower proof than some of the other Old Forester options, it's got a sweet and smooth finish that makes it worthy of its history. The first bourbon in America to be bottled for retail sale, Old Forester seemed to have fallen out of favor a few years ago, overtaken by the 'sex appeal' of newer products that came to market. But we absolutely LOVE this shit and are glad to see folks are coming around to enjoy it as much as we do!

Mix it with a little Ancho Reyes, lemon and simple, and you've got a slightly spicy whiskey sour that's ideal for sipping slowly or knocking back!

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Old Forester 86 Proof
.5 oz Ancho Reyes
.25 oz fresh lemon juice
.25 oz simple syrup
strip of lemon zest for garnish

method:

Combine the Old Forester, Ancho Reyes, lemon juice and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a chilled glass. Garnish twist of lemon. 

The Kernel

No, we're not talking about Mr. Sanders. We're talking about kernal as in corn. The king of the grains. 

A lot of the whiskey and bourbon our there is made with corn - but most of it is a blend of corn and some other grains - wheat, barley, rye, etc. This stuff from Tenn South Distillery is 100% corn. 

And thanks to that corn-centric mash, the finished whiskey has a unique flavor, bordering on fruity - even a little fresh banana fragrance, in fact. So we were playing around with it and came up with a combination of ingredients that might sound a little odd at first. But trust us. It works. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Tenn South Old King Corn Whiskey
.5 oz banana purée (just mash up a ripe banana so it's real good n' smooth)
.5 oz lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
splash of ginger ale
lemon twist for garnish

method:

Combine everything but the ginger ale and lemon garnish in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake like hell and strain it into your rocks glass with fresh ice. Top with ginger ale and garnish with lemon twist.

California Citrus Smash

If you were one of the lucky ones that came to Juniper June, you might remember St. George Spirits. They brought all three of their gin expressions out from California and seriously blew some damn minds that night. 

But if you thought their gin was amazing, just wait until you taste their vodka! Yes, seriously, their vodka. They make three different versions and will be sampling cocktails at our August anniversary bash. Hopefully you're one of the lucky few that got a ticket in the 2.5 hours it took to sell out. If not, we're seriously sorry, but there's always next time. 

Okay, back to their vodka. For this cocktail, we're using their California Citrus Vodka. It's not a flavored vodka - it's infused. Instead of simply adding a flavor, they actually infuse peels from three different types of California-grown citrus before distilling. The mix of Valencia oranges, Seville oranges and Bergamot citrus is absolutely mouth-watering. And this recipe is a great way to enjoy it. . . though we could really just drink the stuff on the rocks. It's that good.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz St. George California Citrus Vodka
1 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.25 oz agave nectar
slice of orange for garnish


method:

Combine everything but the garnish in a shaker with ice and shake to chill. Strain into a glass with fresh ice and garnish with orange slice.

Doctored Pepper

Not all moonshine is created equal. Historically, the term referred to any untaxed alcohol, those these days it's more commonly used to represent what's basically un-aged whiskey. Though, there's plenty of stuff out there that's more like vodka than moonshine. 

That's why we like - no, love - American Born Moonshine. It's made from a blend of corn and sugar and actually has a flavor to it. Yes, we like booze with flavor, is that so bad? It's also got a pretty high proof which is not so bad either. 

But just because we're using a moonshine with flavor, does not mean it's not just as versatile as any other spirit. Try making any of your favorite cocktails - a margarita, daiquiri, etc. - with moonshine and you'll see what we mean. This one might just be one of our all time favorite moonshine drinks. So go ahead and shake one up for yourself and see why we love it!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz American Born Original Moonshine
1.5 oz Meletti Amaro
1 oz dark cherry juice (you can find it in grocery stores or make your own)
.5 oz lemon juice
twist of fresh ground pepper and cherries for garnish

 

method:

Combine all ingredients (except the garnish of course) in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with a twist of fresh-ground pepper on top and a few cherries. 

Rum Blush

The Caribbean is probably best known for their rums (and beaches, we'll give you that one). Essentially made from sugar, rum has much more to it than people realize. Besides the fact that some rums are distilled from fermented molasses and others from sugarcane juice, there's even more variety when you start talking about the influence of barrel aging, spices and other tweaks to a rum recipe. 

We've recently discovered Afrohead Rum. Imported from Trinidad in the West Indies, Afrohead is a premium aged dark rum that's silky smooth with notes of toasty oak and honey. Lucky for you, they're coming to our 1 year anniversary event in August, so you'll get to taste it for yourself! 

For this cocktail, we kept it simple so you could taste (and appreciate) the flavor of the rum. One thing to note - we're using our favorite grenadine from Eli Mason (made here in Nashville!), but don't expect this to be as delicious if you just grab the bright red stuff off the grocery store shelf. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Afrohead Premium Aged Dark Rum
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
.75 oz Eli Mason Classic Grenadine
lemon slice for garnish

method:

Combine the rum, lemon juice and grenadine in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a glass with fresh ice. Garnish with lemon slice.

Morning Glory

If you know us at all by now, you know we can't put any collection of cocktails together without some sort of whiskey or bourbon option. Honestly, who would?

But most people don't think of the brown water when it comes to summertime cocktails. The key is pairing it with bright, refreshing fruit flavors and adding some sort of bubbles to make it gulp-able without completely knocking you on your ass. 

The key to this cocktail is all in the raspberry liqueur. DO NOT just use any kind. Invest in the most incredible raspberry liqueur you'll ever try from St George Spirits. It begins as a raspberry brandy before they add pure raspberry juice. The result is as far as the typical cough syrup liqueur as you'll ever find and well worth having a bottle in your liquor cabinet. Trust. Us.

Starting with great bourbon from Four Roses and the St. George Raspberry Liqueur, we add one more key ingredient - St Germain Elderflower Liqueur. If you don't already own a bottle of this then we're revoking your 3st membership. Just kidding.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
large cooler or cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Four Roses Bourbon
1 oz St. George Raspberry Liqueur
1 oz lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz St Germain Elderflower Liqueur
4-6 oz club soda or seltzer
fresh fruit for garnish

 

method:

Combine your three spirits, lemon juice and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker. Shake with ice to chill and strain into your glass with fresh ice. Fill with seltzer and stir lightly to combine. Garnish and serve. 

Bourbon Fuzz

In case you haven't noticed, it's PEACH SEASON in Nashville! Pretty much anywhere you go, you can find amazing fresh peaches courtesy of The Peach Truck

Unlike grocery store peaches, The Peach Truck brings the peaches straight from the farm in Georgia to Nashville within hours of being plucked from the tree. The result is a fresh peach that dreams are made of. You know, juices running down your chin kind of dreams. 

Anytime we've got fresh fruit, thoughts automatically go to 'what cocktail can we put that in'? With peaches, you're pretty much unlimited. They go great with rum, gin, tequila and of course, bourbon. 

For this cocktail, we've paired the ripe, juicy peaches with Four Roses Bourbon and added a few other special ingredients to make it refreshing but still complex. If you'd like, try swapping out the bourbon for a good quality aged tequila.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Four Roses Bourbon
1/2 fresh peach, plus more for garnish
1/2 oz demerara simple syrup
1/2 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Peach Brandy
club soda


method:

Start by placing the peach half in the bottom of your cocktail shaker. Using your muddler, mash it to release the juices. Since we only want the flavor of the peach, transfer the mashed peach to your fine mesh strainer and use your muddler to push through the juice into your shaker and discard the skin and remnants. Add the bourbon, demerara simple syrup, lemon, Cynar and brandy to your shaker and fill with ice. Shake it vigorously for 10-15 seconds before straining into your rocks glass with fresh ice. Top with club soda and garnish with a slice of peach. 

Tree's Knees

If you're a lover of classic cocktails, you should be familiar with the Bee's Knees cocktail. 

Created in Paris in the early 1930s, this cocktail is the definition of simplicity. Just three ingredients (four if you count the ice), it's what a balanced cocktail should be. But sometimes, it's fun to play around with a classic.

Such frivolity took place when we had our Juniper June event. There were literally dozens of boozy options for folks to try and one of the cocktails was this one. 

Made with Bourbon Barreled Big Gin from Seattle, it already had a little more complexity than the honey-lemon-gin counterpart. But the real secret was the swap of pure maple syrup in place of honey! The earthly flavor of the maple was an ideal balance to the woody gin.

 

EQUIPMENT:

cocktail shaker
strainer
rocks glass

INGREDIENTS:

2 oz Bourbon Barreled Big Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz pure maple syrup


METHOD:

Add all three ingredients to a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. 

Clover Club 2.0

The original Clover Club cocktail pre-dates Prohibition and comes from a men's club in Philly of the same name that would meet regularly at a local hotel. One of the first published recipes 1917 was in The Ideal Bartender by Thomas Bullock and listed the recipe simply. "Fill large Bar glass full Fine Ice. 2 pony Raspberry Syrup. 2 jigger Dry Gin. 1 jigger French Vermouth. White of 1 Egg. Shake well; strain into Cocktail glass and serve." Over the years, the recipe has been published in many forms, often omitting the vermouth and adding fresh lemon. While most recipes call for raspberry syrup, we found one adapted from 1907's Drinks by Paul Lowe that uses raspberry jam.

But we're mixing this classic up just a bit by swapping out fresh raspberries in place of raspberry syrup or jam. The result is exceptional, if we do say so ourselves. But part of what makes this drink so tasty (besides the fresh raspberries) is the choice of gin. 

We're using Sipsmith Gin from London. It's a true London Dry Gin and the bold botanicals make it ideal for cocktails of all sorts. It's made with 10 botanicals from around the globe; Macedonian juniper berries, Bulgarian coriander seed, French angelica root, Spanish licorice root, Italian orris root, Spanish ground almond, Chinese cassia bark, Madagascan cinnamon, Sevillian orange peel and Spanish lemon peel. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Sipsmith London Dry Gin
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
3 fresh raspberries, plus one for garnish
1 bar spoon granulated sugar
egg white

 

method:

Start by placing three fresh raspberries in your cocktail shaker and add the bar spoon of sugar. Muddle to mash and release the juices of the raspberries. Add gin, lemon, simple syrup and egg white and cover. Dry shake (without ice) for at least a minute, shaking it violently to emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air. Add ice and shake very hard for another minute before double-straining into a chilled glass. Garnish with remaining raspberry.

 


Dry Gin Fizz

We've already shared a recipe for the Ramos Gin Fizz. This ain't that. 

The standard Gin Fizz has a history that dates back to the late 1880s when six versions of the "fizz" were included in Jerry Thomas' Bartender's Guide (the first cocktail book published...pretty cool stuff). The Gin Fizz grew in popularity, with many variations on the standard.

To make the basic gin fizz, you really only need four ingredients; gin, lemon, sugar and club soda. Once you start adding other ingredients like egg whites or cream, you have entirely new versions with different properties. An egg yolk makes a Golden Fizz, a whole egg makes a Royal Fizz, champagne in place of club soda makes a Diamond Fizz...and so on. This version is essentially a Silver Gin Fizz, but we've made it with something special - a gin like no other. 

St. George Spirits makes three distinct gins (available individually or as a set of three little bottles); Terroir Gin, Botanivore Gin and Dry Rye Gin. The latter, Dry Rye Gin, is the key to this Dry Gin Fizz. As the name might suggest, it starts with 100% pot-distilled rye, giving a base of spice and richness before then adding six botanicals. Heavy on juniper, it also includes black peppercorn, caraway, coriander, grapefruit peel, lime peel - all of which were selected to compliment the juniper. It's a gin-lover's gin. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins or fizz glass

ingredients:

2 oz St. George Dry Rye Gin
1 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
1 egg white
1.5 oz club soda, chilled


method:

The key to this cocktail is a dry shake (without ice) to emulsify the egg white and incorporate air into the cocktail. So start by adding the gin, lemon, simple and egg white to your cocktail shaker. Cover and shake it HARD for a minimum of one minute. When you think you're done shaking...you're not. Shake it some more. Then add ice and shake it again...until your arm wants to fall off. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into your glass. Let settle for a few seconds before adding your club soda. 

Bee's Knees

Created in Paris in the early 1930s, this cocktail is the definition of simplicity. Just three ingredients (four if you count the ice), it's what a balanced cocktail should be. 

We think a great cocktail should have a relationship between three elements: flavor of the booze (bitter, herbal, woody etc.), acidity and sweetness. If one gets too far out of whack, you end up with something that just doesn't seem right. Ingredients like bitters can help boost the flavor. Citrus juices are the go-to for acidity. And more often than not, simple syrup is used for sweetness.

But with this cocktail, all you need is to start with a great gin. Good thing we have one. Made right here in Nashville, Corsair Distillery has won a butt-load of awards for their Artisan Gin. And for good reason. It's made in very small batches using the 'gin-head' basket on their hand-hammered copper pot still to infuse the flavors of their unusual mix of traditional and unique botanicals.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz Corsair Artisan Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.75 oz honey syrup (equal parts honey and water)


method:

Add all three ingredients to a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice and strain into your chilled glass.

Dutch 75

Chances are you've had a French 75. They're commonplace on many cocktail menus, as the addition of Champagne seems to make them sell. That and, when made with good ingredients, they're really good.

But for this version, we're going to the grandaddy of gin - Genever. Pronounced "gin-KNEE-ver," it's the Dutch predecessor to gin. Made with a base of distilled malted wine, it has a subtle, softer flavor than most modern gins. 

Bols Genever has been around since 1575. Yup, you read that right. But until recently it was was hard to find here in the states. Lucky for us (and you), they'll be coming to Juniper June, so you'll get to taste it if you haven't already.

Make sure your Champagne is nice and cold prior to making this drink, as you'll pour it in at the end.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
champagne flute

ingredients:

1 oz Bols Genever
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)
3 oz Brut Champagne 
lemon twist for garnish


method:

Add the Bols Genever, lemon and simple to a cocktail shaker. Shake with ice to chill and strain into a pre-chilled champagne flute. Top with champagne and garnish with lemon twist.