Goblin Punch

When we first saw Deadhead Rum, we knew it was begging to be included in a Halloween cocktail! C'mon, it's a friggin' shrunken head bottle!

But what cool packaging sometimes hides is a lack-luster product...not the case with this stuff. Though you often think of Mexico as a place for tequila and mezcal, this Mexican rum has a unique flavor, with hints of vanilla and oak. 

It's got a robust flavor that is perfect for cocktails - including this silly little Halloween-inspired drink made green with Midori melon liqueur. 

So, give it a shake, pour it up and get your Halloween party going!

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Deadhead Rum
.5 oz Midori melon liqueur
.5 oz fresh lime juice
2 dashes grapefruit bitters
.5 oz simple syrup
grenadine, lime zest and cherry for garnish

method:

Combine rum, midori, lime, bitters and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into glass. Garnish with a lime zest-wrapped cherry and a few dribbles of grenadine on the rim.

Morgue-arita

We're not typically ones for novelty drinks with silly names and gimmicks. Oh wait...maybe we are. We are talking about booze, after all. 

In a time when everyone seems to take themselves (and their craft) so damn seriously, what's the problem in having a little fun with your cocktails? None. That's what we say. 

So we're putting together a few Halloween cocktails with all the kitsch we can pack into 'em... but don't go thinking just because they have silly names or colorful garnishes that they're not tasty...because they are. 

Take this spin on a margarita for instance. We're using one of our favorite new tequilas, Sangre de Vida. Not only does it come packaged in a very appropriate hand-painted skull, but the shit is seriously tasty. To make it festive, we added some color with Aperol and used black ash salt to rim the glass (find it at specialty food stores or online). 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Sangre de Vida Blanco Tequila
.75 oz Aperol
.75 oz fresh lime juice
.25 oz agave nectar, plus additional for rimming glass
black ash salt for rimming glass

method:

Rim the glass by dipping the edge in agave nectar and black ash salt. Set aside. Combine tequila, Aperol, lime juice and agave nectar in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously and transfer contents to prepared glass. 

Queztal

Tiki. Rum. Punch. Maple Syrup. These all go together, right? Right. We know the whole maple syrup thing sounds weird, and we weren't sure about it ourselves at first, but once we tried it we were hooked. Almost any cocktail is going to have some sort of sweet component to it. This is usually simple syrup, occasionally with a flavor included, but almost always made with basic white sugar. Don't get us wrong, we are big fans and users of simple syrup, but why not mix it up a little bit? 

To avoid any confusion, we are talking about real, pure maple syrup. If you use something in a plastic or woman-shaped bottle you're drink won't be right, as that is corn syrup, which is completely different. Real maple syrup will have a slightly thinner texture and a more subtle flavor than it's processed counterpart.

Enough about syrup, let's talk rum punch! While perfectly drinkable all summer long, this recipe will keep your tiki dreams alive well into the fall. The recipe below is for one drink, but is easily translated into a party punch that will serve many

Equipment

Cocktail shaker

Ingredients

1.5 oz Pyrat Rum
.5 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz orange juice
.5 oz pineapple juice
1 oz maple syrup
2 dashes bitters

Method

Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake until well mixed and strain into a glass with fresh ice.

Black Daiquiri

Tiki drinks don't get much more classic (or easy to make) than a daiquiri. The tart lime juice mixed with sweet rum will put you right into a Key West state of mind. We know that Ernest Hemingway was a big fan of these drinks, inspiring small modifications at his favorite places and even getting some new versions of this classic named for him. We made a little modification for ourselves, and we think that if Hemingway had gone black, he might not have gone back. 

You may hear daiquiri and think of a bright red strawberry frozen drink served in a neon plastic vessel somewhere near a beach. That really could not be further from what a true daiquiri is. Typically a daiquiri is made with white rum, lime juice, and sugar, shaken up and served over crushed ice.  It has a very light, refreshing flavor that is dominated by lime juice. While our version has the same components, we have highlighted the many flavors of sugar instead. That doesn't mean we're trying to sell you a sweet drink, just a cocktail with a richer depth of flavor that can be enjoyed year round. 

Instead of white rum, we've used black, which retains much more of the molasses flavor that gets removed from the white stuff. And instead of white sugar, we made our daiquiri with a demerara simple syrup, made with demerara sugar, which is a less refined type of sugar with much more flavor than it's white cousin. Without making the drink any sweeter than it traditionally would be, these ingredients add a comforting warmth to this beach classic.

Equipment

Cocktail shaker
Crushed ice

Ingredients

2 oz Kraken Black Rum
1 oz Eli Mason Demerara Syrup
1 oz fresh lime juice

Method

Combine all ingredients in cocktail shaker with ice cubes. Shake until shaker feels frozen on the outside and strain into cocktail glass over crushed ice.

Barbacoa

As much as we love mezcal, it isn't necessarily the best spirit for mixing. It has a very strong, distinct smoky flavor, much like that of a scotch. That's probably why a mezcal is most often enjoyed neat or on the rocks with little more that a piece of lime. We here at 3st strive to bring you the best in cocktails, so we did a little experimenting with the stuff and came up with something that really highlights the flavors of mezcal, but also softens it with complements. Now we know you might be thinking "bell peppers in a cocktail?" And that is certainly a fair question. The campfire flavors of the mezcal don't lend themselves to sweetness very well, so we went the savory route. We used ginger and citrus to round out the drink. This drink ended up being quite popular at our recent Tikitober event, so we hope you'll try it out and enjoy it too!

Equipment

Cocktail shaker
Crushed ice
Muddler

Ingredients

1.5 oz Los Amantes Mezcal Reposado
1 oz ginger simple syrup
2-3 1 inch slices green bell pepper
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz fresh lime juice

Method

Muddle bell pepper and ginger syrup in cocktail shaker. Add ice cubes (not crushed) and remaining ingredients. Shake and strain over crushed ice. Garnish with a new piece of bell pepper.

Singapore Sling

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Originally created in a bar in Singapore 100 years ago and one of the oldest cocktail recipes still popular today, the Sling was adopted into tiki culture early on by Trader Vic (a pioneer of tiki drinks in the US) in a section of his drink menu titled "Drinks I Have Gathered from the Four Corners of the Globe." This menu also included such notables at the Pimm's Cup and Pisco Punch. Like it's cousin the Mai Tai, the Singapore Sling is probably most often thought of as a sweet, red drink full of rum that you enjoy at the hibachi grill, rather than the complex, tart, slightly bitter gin based cocktail it actually is. If anything, the Singapore Sling stands as the least saccharine tiki drink popular today, with all sweetness imparted by juice and the booze itself.

The famed mixologist D.A. Embury once said that "Of all the recipes published for [this drink] I have never seen any two that were alike." This one is based on one of the commonly accepted "original" recipes, but made it a little more modern and easy to make at home.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Cocktail strainer
Hurricane-style glass

Ingredients:

1.5 oz london dry gin
.5 oz Benedictine
.5 oz Cherry Heering (or cherry brandy)
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz pineapple juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
club soda

Method:

Fill shaker with ice. Combine gin, Benedictine, Cherry Heering, lime juice, pineapple juice, and bitters. Shake vigorously. Fill hurricane glass with fresh ice and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with fresh fruit. 



Mai Tai

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Invented (arguably) by Trader Vic in his Oakland, CA restaurant in 1944, the Mai Tai gets its name from from a friend of Vic's, who tasted his first ever concoction and remarked that the drink was "mai tai," a Tahitian colloquialism that roughly translates to "awesome." We can't argue there. 

You might hear Mai Tai and think of some drink you had at a Chinese restaurant somewhere that was extremely sweet and bright red, garnished with pineapple and cherries, but in actuality that drink couldn't have been further from the real thing. Sometime in the illustrious 70's the Mai Tai went off the rails in American restaurants, becoming bastardized into some sort of rum punch made with shitty, cheap liquor and finished with whatever sweet juice and grenadine was available. Of course they were popular! Your mom and her friends (and everyone else) loved sweet, fruity drinks of an unnaturally red hue! 

We want to put those days behind us and drink the real thing; which is a refreshing, boozy concoction straight from the beach.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Crushed ice

Ingredients:

2 oz Afrohead XO Aged Dark Rum   (Appleton Estate is traditionally used)
.75 oz fresh lime juice
.75 oz orgeat syrup
.5 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao 
fresh mint
Luxardo Maraschino Cherry

Method:

Fill cocktail shaker and with crushed ice. In shaker combine rum, lime juice, orgeat, and curaçao. Shake vigorously and strain over crushed ice in a tall glass. Garnish with mint and cherry.

Saint Snapper

Even though we think that whiskey is at its most perfect neat in a glass, sometimes a delicious cocktail is what we want to drink, and who are we to stand in our own way? Do what you want to do and drink what you want to drink, that's what we say. 

Nashville's own Belle Meade Bourbon has been making a name for itself these past few years, quickly becoming one of the most popular whiskeys in town. While it stands strong on its own, it also plays well with others. Here at 3st of the Month, we like to play around with time-honored standards and offer a new spin, perhaps a fresh twist on a drink that you might not have had in a while.

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker
Cocktail strainer
Rocks glass

Ingredients:

2 oz Belle Meade Bourbon
1 oz cranberry juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.25 oz lime juice
.25 oz herbsaint (or absinthe)

Method:

Rinse rocks glass with Herbsaint, discard remainder. Fill glass with ice. In cocktail shaker, combine bourbon, cranberry juice, simple syrup, and lime juice with ice. Shake and strain into prepared rocks glass.

Islay Vacation

If all you think of when you think of Scotch is old men in suits, it's time to expand your horizons. 

Scotch is essentially just whiskey, but with a little something extra... Peat. What is it? Well, let us tell you. Peat is basically old, decayed plant material that forms over thousands of years in certain areas. Scotland, for instance, is one of those areas. The peat is cut from the ground in blocks, dried and used as a fuel source. We'll come back to the use of peat in just a minute...

When making Scotch (and most spirits), grains (barley, rye, etc.) are turned into a mash (think runny oatmeal) and yeast eats the sugars, creating alcohol. That mash is then distilled and the booze is aged in barrels. By allowing the grains to partially germinate, it converts starches into sugars. But you want to stop the germination process with heat before the grains actually sprout. A 'peated' whisky refers to the use of peat as the heat source in drying the grain prior to making the mash. The smoky flavors from the peat add significant character the end product, making Scotch unique from other whisk(e)ys. 

Now that we've had a history lesson, let's talk about this cocktail. Since Scotch has so much flavor, we figured we would use it in a Tiki drink, a perfect cocktail to appreciate the flavors of Scotch without slapping you across the face with them. The use banana, in particular, is a great partner for the flavors of good Scotch. In this case, we're using Laphroaig (pronounced like this). It's been around for 200 years, so you know they've got their shit together.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
collins glass

ingredients

1.5 oz Laphroaig Single Malt Scotch Whisky
.75 oz lime juice
.75 oz pineapple juice
.5 oz banana puree (just mash up a ripe banana until very smooth)
1 oz simple syrup
4 dashes tiki bitters
fresh mint for garnish

method:

Combine everything except the mint in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously with ice to chill. Transfer to a glass and garnish with fresh mint. 



The Blind Melon

For our "Best of the Barrel" 3st of the Month, we're bringing in a TON of amazing bourbon and whiskey. But that's not the only stuff that gets barrel aged. 

So, we're also bringing in a few surprises - like this amazing cachaça from Novo Fogo. Similar to rum, cachaça (pronounced like this) is made from sugarcane. But unlike rum, which is usually made from molasses, cachaça is made from sugar cane juice. 

The Novo Fogo Tanger Cachaça takes the base spirit and ages it twice - first with repurposed bourbon barrels and then with Brazilian zebrawood. The finished product is complex and delicious - and perfect for sipping alone or mixed into cocktails like this one. 

When working with cachaça, we like to keep the flavors fresh and fruity to play off of the sugarcane flavor.

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
tall glass

ingredients:

Novo Fogo Tanger
.5 oz fresh lime juice
3 oz fresh watermelon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
wedge of watermelon for garnish

method:

 

 

 

 

Combine all the ingredients (except the garnish of course) in your cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake with ice and transfer entire contents to the glass. Top with more ice if needed, garnish and serve. 

Tennessiki

Tiki drinks have made a huge comeback in the world of cocktails, and you won't hear any complaints from us! What's not to love about fruity, fun drinks with exotic ingredients? Not to mention all of the cool, kitschy glassware and garnishes that come along with tiki! While some people may think that tiki drinks are all sweet, sugary concoctions that your too-tan aunt Linda drank by the pool, that actually couldn't be further from the truth. While little paper umbrellas and bright red cherry garnishes might appear from time to time, tiki drinks are most often crafted from tart, even bitter ingredients that highlight the small amount of sweet fruit included in the cocktail.

Of course, when one thinks tiki, they probably think rum. Tiki can be made with just about any spirit you want to include. There are very few rules to tiki; it is a state of mind more than anything! Of course our spin on tiki had to include a Tennessee element, so we thought why not use a little Tennessee whiskey instead of rum for that southern flair. Because fruit complements whiskey so well, tiki seemed only natural! Most of the fruit we use in this drink is tart, with only a little bit of sweet nuttiness coming from the amaretto. Although we may not be drinking this on a tropical island somewhere, this cocktail makes any day a day at the beach!

You could choose to make this as a shaken drink, but we opted to blend it up instead. Either way, it's a refreshing whiskey cocktail!

equipment:

blender
tiki glass

ingredients:

2 oz Clayton James Tennessee Whiskey
.5 oz amaretto liqueur
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.5 oz raspberry puree
.5 oz lime juice
1 oz orange juice
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
4-6 oz crushed ice

method:

Add all ingredients into the blend and process until smooth. Pour into glass and garnish with something frilly!

3rd Coast

When you see a frozen drink with an umbrella it's hard not to imagine yourself somewhere on the beach. Waves crashing...sand in your ass crack...someone's noisy kids running around and making noise while you're trying to relax...can't you just picture it?

But more often than not, these drinks are made with rum. We figured it was high time tequila got it's turn in a foo-foo umbrella drink. 

The trick to this recipe is that we're using anejo. There's basically three types of (good) tequila. Blanco (or silver) tequila is the distilled spirit that's simply bottled. Reposado translates to 'rested' and is the blanco tequila that's allowed to mellow in barrels for up to 364 days. The second you get past the one year mark, that rested reposado become Anejo. And, as you might imagine, the older the tequila, the more interesting the flavor. In this case, the oaky notes of Trianon Anejo still slides through the sweetness of the banana and coconut, but balances perfectly with the citrus and pineapple. 

equipment:

blender
large cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Trianon Anejo Tequila
1 frozen banana (peeled, of course)
1 oz cream of coconut
3 oz pineapple juice
1 oz lime juice
1 cup crushed ice

method:

Combine all ingredients in a blender and process until smooth.  


Caipirinha

This is a cocktail of differences. 

Easy to compare to a mojito, it's not. And with the base spirit of cachaça (pronounced ka-shaw-sa) that's sometimes mistaken for rum, there's even further distinction that needs to be made.

Let's start with cachaça. Like rum, cachaça is a sugarcane spirit. But where rum is typically distilled from the molasses leftover from sugar production, cachaça is actually made directly from sugarcane juice. It's fermented and distilled into a clear, deliciously-boozy spirit. Once made, it can be aged in barrels like rum to enhance the depth and flavor. 

In fact, one of our favorite cachaças, Novo Fogo, comes in various forms, aged in barrels for 1 or 2 years and even a variety aged in zebra wood. For this one, we're using the Novo Fogo Chameleon, which is aged for one year in repurposed American oak barrels.

As for this cocktail, the caipirinha, is the national drink of Brazil (where most cachaça comes from) and is not a mojito. First of all, there is no mint. Secondly, you usually do not add seltzer (unless you're trying to water it down a bit...which is not a bad idea).

So, let's make one!

equipment:

cocktail shaker
rocks glass
muddler

ingredients:

2 oz Novo Fogo Chameleon Cachaça
1/2 of a big, juicy lime (or one little lime)
2 tsp demerara sugar

method:

Cut the lime into cubes and add it, with the sugar, to the bottom of your shaker tin. Muddle to release the juices. Add the cachaça to the glass, cover and shake a bit to help dissolve the sugar. Add the amount of ice you would need to fill your glass to your shaker tin, cover and shake vigorously. Transfer entire contents into your glass. 

Pirate Punch

We love a good Tiki drink. Scratch that. We love a great Tiki drink. 

But what makes a great one? It's a few things really. Obviously, you have to start with good booze. For this one we've used Shellback Rum. It comes in both a silver un-aged version and a tasty spiced rum. For the sake of simplicity, we made this with just the silver rum, but it would be even better with an ounce of each!

The second element you need is fresh fruit juices - and a variety of them ideally. And, finally, you need an element of spice. This can come in the form of a few dashes of bitters, a sprinkle of cinnamon or, in this case, a half ounce of Pimento Dram, an allspice liqueur. 

Because what really makes a good Tiki drink a great one is layers of flavor. Well, that and maybe a creative garnish or two. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
tiki cup (or any cup, really)

ingredients:

2 oz Shellback Silver Rum
1 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz fresh orange juice
1 oz pineapple juice
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz pimento dram (allspice liqueur)
2 dashes aromatic bitters
fresh fruit garnish

 

method:

Combine everything but the garnish in a cocktail shaker and shake the living daylights out of it to chill before straining into a glass with crushed ice. Garnish and serve. 

M-80

As part of our 'throw your own 3st' for July, we've put together a bunch of fireworks-themed cocktails. Though it may take a little prep and planning, this cocktail is worth the effort. 

And just like we think any cocktail collection must have something with bourbon or whiskey, we feel the same about TEQUILA!

This one is really serving a few purposes. Obviously the booze has a specific role to play, and the fruit in the ice cubes is borderline fruit salad. But the coconut water in the mixer is the ideal way to stay hydrated during your summer cocktail sessions! Isn't it some sort of super food or something?

To make your ice cubes, place a few berries (we used blueberries and raspberries) in your ice cube trays and fill with water. Freeze 'em overnight and they're done. So, go ahead, make the store run now... you can thank us later when people are complimenting your patriotic ice cubes. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
ice cube trays (for the fruit cubes)

ingredients:

2 oz Cabo Wabo Blanco Tequila
.5 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz simple syrup
4 oz coconut water
fruit ice cubes

 

method:

Place the tequila, lime juice, simple syrup and coconut water in your cocktail shaker with plain ice cubes. Shake to chill and strain into your glass with those fancy-ass fruit ice cubes. Serve and gloat in your cocktail glory.

Bottle Rocket

As you probably know, we're taking July off from throwing our own 3st of the Month event.

Why? There's a few reasons. The first is that we already have an event that we're going to (you're welcome to join us). The second reason is that we're just kinda beat. We've been throwing these parties for almost a year. Which brings us to our third reason...we're working on one hell of a party in August to mark our 1 year anniversary! 

But just because we have good reason to take a month off doesn't mean we don't just feel a little guilty. So, we're making up for it by putting together this series of fireworks-themed cocktails so you can throw your own 3st in July - complete with a playlist and all. 

We couldn't do fireworks-themed cocktails without a bottle rocket. And like the flammable kind, this one packs a BANG! It's double-boozy thanks to the locally-made Pennington's Strawberry Rye Whiskey and a base of Anthem Cider (remember them from last December's "Bubbles" event?). Anthem is a great-tasting dry apple cider (not sweet) and perfect for this cocktail. 

We just ask that, like with real fireworks, you handle these safely. 

 

equipment:

10 oz resealable bottle
small funnel

ingredients:

2 oz Pennington's Strawberry Rye Whiskey
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz cranberry juice
6 oz Anthem Apple Cider


method:

Make these in advance so you can ice them down. Using a funnel, add all ingredients to the bottle and reseal. Chill until drinking. 

Black Cat

If you attended our "Bitter Lovers" event in February or "Tres de Mayo" in May, you likely got to taste Black Magic Rum. A delicious dark spiced rum, Black Magic is fantastic whipped into all sorts of cocktails - like that crazy-delicious Black Magic Margarita they served in May?!?

But, we're getting ready for the 4th of July (and taking a month off from hosting), so we're playing around with cocktails and using fireworks as our inspiration. As far as fireworks go, if you didn't have Black Cat Firecrackers as a kid then you didn't have a childhood. Just saying.

And although this drink is not quite black, it does have quite a bang due to the 2.5 total ounces of booze and some tasty juices. The color gets a little darker thanks to a splash of blue curacao, but it's honestly pretty good (and a slightly more appealing color) without it. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
highball or cooler glass

ingredients:

2 oz Black Magic Rum
.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz cranberry juice
.5 oz blue curacao
splash of club soda


method:

Combine the first four ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and pour into a glass. Top with club soda. 

Lavender Ramos Gin Fizz

There's essentially two types of "gin fizz" cocktails. Those with cream and those without. Both have egg white and both are delicious, but you'll be amazed at how different they are. 

The Ramos Gin Fizz is a classic New Orleans cocktail that was invented in the 1880s by Henry Ramos. The original instructions called for 12 minutes of shaking time - needless to say, there were some seriously sore arms among those bartenders.

While we're not going to shake this thing for 12 minutes, it does require some serious shaking. The key to making it work is shaking twice. First, a dry shake without ice to help emulsify the ingredients and incorporate air and second, a shake with ice to add even more air and chill the cocktail. Both of these should be downright violent shakes, each lasting well over a minute. 

To make this unique, we're adding a little lavender bitters. A common ingredient that appears in gins, lavender really sets this off. If you don't have lavender bitters, just make it without - it will still be a damn good drink. You'll want to use a good, strongly-flavored gin like Edinburgh Gin for this one so the flavors come through the egg white and cream.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
fine mesh strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Edinburgh Gin
.75 oz heavy cream
.75 oz simple syrup
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 egg white
3-5 drops orange flower water
1 dash lavender bitters
1.5 oz club soda, chilled
a few dried lavender buds for garnish (optional)


method:

Add all ingredients except seltzer and garnish to a cocktails shaker (without ice!) and dry shake for at least one minute. When your arm gets tired, switch sides and shake again. When you think you're done, you're not...keep shaking. Then add ice and shake again...hard. Keep shaking. Don't stop. Okay, now you're done.

Double-strain into a chilled collins glass and let settle for minute before topping with club soda. Sprinkle a few lavender buds on top.

Rhubarb Sour

Gin sours have a place in cocktail history and lore. A quick google search will bring up over a million references...and for good reason. It's a match made in heaven.

Gin has the robust flavor that can stand up to tart citrus, typically lime or lemon. So with this drink, we figured we should take the tartness up just a bit with everyone's favorite springtime sour - RHUBARB!

Made in Brookly, Morris Kitchen makes an outstanding Rhubarb Syrup. Similar to a shrub, it has a little apple cider vinegar to play off the natural tartness of the rhubarb. It also has cane sugar, which helps this cocktail from being completely face-puckering. If you're in Nashville, you can find a bottle at Hey Rooster General Store in East Nashville.

In order to not let the gin overtake the flavors of the rhubarb, we're using Prairie Gin. Some of you may recognize it, as they came to our very first 3st of the Month in August 2014 and we have used it in other cocktails ever since. It's a kinder, gentler gin. Not too intense with juniper and very smooth. Good stuff indeed. Check them out. They're a group of three family farms that not only grow the organic grains used in their spirits, but own the distillery as well. 

Okay, enough rambling...on to this tasty-ass cocktail!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
double-old fashioned glass

ingredients:

2 oz Prairie Organic Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.75 oz Morris Kitchen Rhubarb Syrup
2 oz soda water/seltzer, chilled
fresh thyme for garnish


method:

Combine the gin, lime and rhubarb syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into your glass with fresh ice. Top with soda and garnish with a sprig of thyme.

The Best Gimlet Ever

If you're like us, you've probably had a Gimlet somewhere in your drinking history...and you were not that impressed. Too often they're either WAY to tart, too sweet or honestly just not that delicious. Well, news flash... you haven't had this gimlet.

You'll find recipes that call for Rose's lime juice. Don't use it. While that stuff might have a place in some cocktails, it does not belong in this one. Instead, follow the easy recipe at the bottom of this post to make your own lime cordial with just lime zest and simple syrup. You can thank us later.

As for the gin, we reached for good ol' Plymouth Gin on this one because a classic cocktail deserves a classic gin. They've been making it since 1793, so you know they have to be doing something right! It's a unique, protected style of gin that only they make. Go get some.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Plymouth Gin
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.75 oz lime cordial (see easy recipe below)
slice of lime for garnish


method:

Place your glass in the freezer to get it ice cold. Add your gin, lime juice and lime cordial to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Give it a good, spirited shake and strain into your chilled glass before dropping in the slice of lime to garnish. 

lime cordial 

1 lime, washed
4 oz simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water)

Using a microplane grater, remove all the zest from the lime. Add the lime zest to your simple syrup, stir to combine and let it sit at room temperature for 15-20 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh strainer, pressing the remaining zest to get every damn drop of deliciousness. Refrigerate until needed.