Floridita

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

You've heard of a daiquiri. You've heard of Ernest Hemmingway (we hope). And you might know that those two things go together like Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Used to be, when we thought of a daiquiri, it was of the strawberry variety; bright red and fresh out of the island oasis machine, possibly topped with canned whipped cream. How misinformed we were! The original daiquiris of Hemmingway's day were simple concoctions of rum, sugar, and lime with crushed ice. Papa Doblo (Daddy Double), as he was known to the bartenders in Cuba, earned his name by ordering two drinks at a time. Sometimes referred to as Daiquiri #2, the Floridita stays true to it's roots, embellished only with a little bit of Luxardo and grapefruit juice.

When it comes to frozen or blended drinks, ice becomes a measurable ingredient. You don't want to use too much or too little, otherwise the proportions of booze will be off, and we certainly don't want that! We consulted a bartender friend of ours on the matter and he gave us a great tip on measuring the perfect amount of ice. Simply fill the glass you plan on serving your drink in with ice, and dump that right into your blender. The liquid will fill in the gaps. This recipe makes one drink but is easy to multiply, just measure your ice accordingly.

Equipment:

Blender
Bar spoon

Ingredients:

2 oz Flor de Cana White Rum
.75 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz Luxardo
.5 oz grapefruit juice
granulated sugar
maraschino cherry for garnish

Method:

Combine two bar spoons of sugar, rum, lime juice, Luxardo, and grapefruit juice in blender with (measured) ice. Blend until smooth and garnish with a cherry. Ideally the drink will be thick enough for the cherry to rest on top with out sinking. Thats how you know you used the right amount of ice.

Tennessiki

Tiki drinks have made a huge comeback in the world of cocktails, and you won't hear any complaints from us! What's not to love about fruity, fun drinks with exotic ingredients? Not to mention all of the cool, kitschy glassware and garnishes that come along with tiki! While some people may think that tiki drinks are all sweet, sugary concoctions that your too-tan aunt Linda drank by the pool, that actually couldn't be further from the truth. While little paper umbrellas and bright red cherry garnishes might appear from time to time, tiki drinks are most often crafted from tart, even bitter ingredients that highlight the small amount of sweet fruit included in the cocktail.

Of course, when one thinks tiki, they probably think rum. Tiki can be made with just about any spirit you want to include. There are very few rules to tiki; it is a state of mind more than anything! Of course our spin on tiki had to include a Tennessee element, so we thought why not use a little Tennessee whiskey instead of rum for that southern flair. Because fruit complements whiskey so well, tiki seemed only natural! Most of the fruit we use in this drink is tart, with only a little bit of sweet nuttiness coming from the amaretto. Although we may not be drinking this on a tropical island somewhere, this cocktail makes any day a day at the beach!

You could choose to make this as a shaken drink, but we opted to blend it up instead. Either way, it's a refreshing whiskey cocktail!

equipment:

blender
tiki glass

ingredients:

2 oz Clayton James Tennessee Whiskey
.5 oz amaretto liqueur
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.5 oz raspberry puree
.5 oz lime juice
1 oz orange juice
.5 oz lemon juice
2 dashes Angostura Bitters
4-6 oz crushed ice

method:

Add all ingredients into the blend and process until smooth. Pour into glass and garnish with something frilly!

Greenhouse

Yeah, yeah, yeah. You probably get tired hearing us RAVE about the spirits we use. That's because we use good shit. 

Our goal when we started 3st of the Month was to turn people on to stuff they may have never had before and reintroduce them to things they should be drinking more often. Over the past year we've had dozens of amazing top-shelf spirits, wine and beer join us on our adventure. Every now and then we're lucky to have them back more than once.

Art in the Age is the perfect example of why we set out to do this whole 3st thing in the first place. This stuff is so good it can't be categorized or grouped with any other spirit. Made with organic ingredients, they craft creative infused spirits like ROOTSNAPSAGE and RHUBARB Tea. SAGE is a hell of a lot more complex than the name would suggest. It's kinda like a "garden gin," made with sage, rosemary, fennel, thyme, sumac, dandelion and angelica. Though it's lacking the key ingredient to technically make it a gin (juniper), we're happy they're coming back to join us for Juniper June.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz Art in the Age SAGE
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.75 oz Lillet Blanc
dash aromatic bitters
sprig of rosemary for garnish

method:

Add the spirits and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into a pre-chilled glass. Garnish with rosemary.

Martinez

Often thought of as the 'father' to the infamous gin martini, the Martinez may just be more like a cousin than a father. It uses sweet vermouth (instead of dry) and few other extra ingredients that differentiate it from it's clear relative. It's true origins are a bit of a mystery.

For the educated drinker, you might also see a resemblance to the Manhattan, which mixes bourbon/whiskey with sweet vermouth. 

Stories abound about the true origin, but really who gives a shit when the drink is this good? 

The great thing about gin is the variety. From one brand to the next, you'll find different proprietary recipes of botanicals, different base spirits and methods of distillation and even different methods of infusing those botanicals. One gin that we've grown pretty damn fond of is Uncle Val's. Actually, we should say three gins, because Uncle Val's produces three distinct varieties - Botanical, Restorative and Peppered - all of which will be served up at Juniper June.

For this version of the Martinez, we're using the Uncle Val's Restorative Gin, made with the classic mix of juniper and gin botanicals, with the addition of cucumber and rose. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Uncle Val's Restorative Gin
1.5 oz Carpano Antica (sweet vermouth)
1 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
2 dashes orange bitters
wist of lemon zest for garnish

 

method:

Start by chilling your glass. This is essential for any cocktail, especially one that you're serving without ice. Add the Uncle Val's Restorative Gin, Carpano Antica, Luxardo and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into your chilled glass. Garnish with lemon twist. 

 


Gin Daiquiri

Yeah, of course we all know a daiquiri is supposed to be made with rum. But who gives a shit? We don't, that's for sure.

We recently gathered in a cocktail-fest of sorts, making all kinds of drinks with the incredible lineup of spirits that are joining us for Juniper June.

We're all big fans of the original daiquiri, so it only made sense to try one made with gin. But not just any gin.

You see, many gins have a very strong juniper flavor that would overwhelm this cocktail. Hendrick's Gin, on the other hand, is what we call a 'gateway gin,' with subtle flavors of cucumber and rose. It's smooth and delicious. Just like this cocktail. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Hendrick's Gin
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
.25 oz demerara simple syrup (equal parts demerara sugar and water)
.25 Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
fresh mint for garnish


method:

Combine the Hendrick's Gin, lime juice, simple and Luxardo in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Aviation

Originally created in the early 1900's the first written recipe of this classic cocktail came in 1916. 

Likely named for the light sky blue hue it gets from crème de violette (violet liqueur), it's basically a variation on a gin sour, using one of our favorite ingredients, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur as the sweetener. 

Since crème de violette was once often difficult to come by, there's been variations of the recipe floating around for years without it. These days, that's a crock of shit, as you can find Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette at most liqueur stores. It has a intense earthy flavor, so know that a little goes a very long way. 

But despite the light blue color, the real star of this cocktail is the GIN! Most recipes call for a dry London-style gin. Well, we have just the gin for that! Sipsmith is a craft distiller in London and makes a mighty fine London Dry Gin. They're one of many incredible gins joining us for Juniper June and we can't wait for folks to give them a try!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

2 oz Sipsmith London Dry Gin
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.25 oz Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice


method:

Start by pre-chilling your coupe glass. In a cocktail shaker, add all ingredients and fill with ice. Cover and shake to chill before straining into your chilled glass. 

The Veneto

In preparation for our April 3st of the Month and a theme that's "all about the grapes," we're playing around with some grape-based booze. 

In this cocktail, we're using Alexander Grappa, one of our April booze partners, to make a damn tasty sipper. Grappa can pack a punch, with proofs ranging from 70-120. Luckily, Alexander Grappa is hovering right at 80 proof, which makes it ideal for mixing into cocktails. 

We've written about Grappa before, but the key is that it is an Italian spirit. We figured we'd stay with that theme and mix in a couple other ingredients from its native land - Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur and freshly-juice Valencia oranges. Okay, so maybe these oranges didn't come from Italy, but you get the point. Don't split hairs. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
mesh strainer
coupe cocktail glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Alexander Grappa
1.5 oz freshly-squeezed Valencia orange juice
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.5 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao
granulated sugar for garnish


method:

After juicing the orange, rub the cut side of the orange on the outside edge of one side of the glass and dip it in sugar. Set it aside. Combine remaining ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake the hell out of it for about 15 - 20 seconds. Double-strain into the cocktails glass. Enjoy!

The Last Word

When it comes to classic cocktails, sometimes you just don't need to mess with perfection...much. 

The classic cocktail, The Last Word, is one of those. A perfect balance of four equal proportions; Chartreuse, gin, lime and Luxardo Maraschino liqueur, it's a harmonious creation that's meant for savoring every single sip. 

But, you know us. We just had to fuck with it. So instead of using regular Chartreuse, we used Yellow Chartreuse. Originally started in 1737 by French Monks, the formula of botanicals in Chartreuse is a closely-guarded secret. All we know is there's about 130 different botanicals that are added, giving traditional Chartreuse its signature herbal flavor. Yellow Chartreuse is also a secret, but there's a slight variation in the formula, giving it a more subtle flavor and lighter color. 

Try this one. Trust us.

 

equipment:

cocktails shaker
hawthorne strainer
fine mesh strainer
coupe glass

ingredients:

1 oz Yellow Chartreuse
1 oz Edinburgh Gin
1 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
1 oz fresh lime juice


method:

combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker and shake to chill. Double strain into a chilled coupe glass. Enjoy.

Gin for the Win Cocktail

Gin. Likely the most misunderstood and under-appreciated booze out there today, well at least here in the South. 

There are many different varieties of gin, and each has its own flavor and profile. Some are significantly more fragrant and flavorful than others, with notes of juniper in the forefront. Others use botanicals like cucumber and rose to impart a more subtle flavor.

What's great about gin is that it has the mix-ability of a clear spirit and the complexity of a brown spirit. While we LOVE making cocktails with gin, a great gin really could simply be sipped neat or with single cube or two.

This simple cocktail takes Bols Genever Gin, made with the original 1820 recipe, and pairs it with a few pantry staples to create this slightly sweet and very delicious cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks or old fashioned glass

ingredients:

2 oz Bols Genever Gin
1 oz Cocchi Rosa
.5 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.75 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1 dash aromatic bitters
Luxardo cherries for garnish


method:

Combine all the spirits and lemon juice in the mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill for 15-20 seconds. Place 2-3 cubes in your rocks glass and strain cocktail into glass. Add dash of bitters on top and garnish with cherries.

Bitter Angel

If you've never had Angel's Envy Bourbon or Angel's Envy Rye, you're seriously missing out. Both are unique in that they are aged new oak like other spirits, but they they go the extra step to finish them in recycled barrels from complimenting spirits. The bourbon is finished in port wine barrels and the rye in rum barrels. This process imparts a level of flavor to what would certainly be great booze on its own.

Angel's Envy is going to be present at our September 3st of the Month "Whisk(e)y vs Bourbon" event, so we figured it is high time we started making some cocktails!

When making cocktails with an outstanding base spirit the goal is to not cover up the flavors, but enhance them. That's why we love aperitifs...but you probably know that by now. Be it Aperol, Campari, Cynar, Fernet Branca. . . or in this case, Averna Amaro

Amaro literally means "bitter" in Italian. There are dozens of variations and the many varieties of bitter aperitifs can technically be called an Amaro (Cynar and Fernet, for example). But there's something perhaps a little softer in the flavor of Averna Amaro than some of the other options out there. You still get the dimension that rounds out the flavor of a cocktail, but we think it's less likely to overwhelm than some other varieties. 

Go get a bottle. You'll be glad you did.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
old fashioned glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Angel's Envy Bourbon
.75 oz Averna Amaro
.75 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
2 dashes black walnut bitters
Luxardo maraschino cherry for garnish

 

method:

Fill an old fashioned glass with ice to chill and set aside. Add about 4-5 ice cubes to your mixing glass and add the spirits, lemon juice and bitters. Stir to chill for 15 seconds or so. Discard ice from the chilling old fashioned glass, add a couple/few ice cubes and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with cherry and serve.

Take the Train

The Aviation is a classic gin cocktail many of heard of. It's made with gin, lemon and maraschino liqueur with touch of creme de violette, a violet-hued and flavored liqueur. The touch of blue was reminiscent of the sky, henceforth inspiring a name that conjured up images of the heyday of aviation - you know, leather jackets, spinning propellers and luxury. Well, since these days the word aviation brings up images of people wandering around in socks without their belts, we thought this one was ready for a re-vamp. Meet Take the Train.

It's still made with gin, lemon and maraschino liqueur, but with a couple new additions. Since creme de violette is one of those things you're likely not going to get a lot of mileage from in your home bar, let's skip it. A couple of things you should have stocked in your home bar are gomme syrup and delicious Amarena cherries from Italy. Both are ingredients you'll likely reach for time and time again. This, coupled with another product we love, Lillet Blanc, is what you'll need for Take the Train.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz gin
.5 oz gomme syrup
.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
.5 oz Lillet Blanc
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
Amarena cherry in syrup for garnish

 

method:

Place all ingredients excluding the cherry in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Give it a quick shake to chill and strain into chilled glass. Garnish with a Amarena cherry and bit of syrup.

Demonbreun Hill

Booze doesn't have to be complicated, but damn if folks don't like to make it that way. Take the bourbon/whiskey/scotch issue, for instance. While some folks may not be able to discern the difference between bourbon and whiskey, there are many levels of differentiation ranging from the grains that start the fermentation to the water used to the filtering and distillation and, of course, the barrels themselves. 

So, while we make the Demonbreun Hill using Prichard's Single Malt Whiskey, we invite you to use whatever you have on hand...even though this stuff is pretty damn tasty.

We would also like to take a second to talk about gomme syrup. Pronounced "gum," gomme syrup is a classic ingredient that is making a resurgence, thanks in part to businesses like Eli Mason. While simple syrup is typically a 1:1 ratio of sugar and water (hence the name simple, get it?), "rich" simple syrup is a 2:1 sugar to water ratio (and sometimes even more). When making a rich simple syrup, the sugar can often crystalize over time. By adding gum arabic, the syrup is not only emulsified to prevent crystal formation, but it takes on a velvety smooth texture and mouth-feel. This silky texture softens the boozy edge, easing in the enjoyment of "spirit-forward" cocktails such as the Demonbreun Hill.

equipment:

mixing glass
strainer
rocks glass
large cube
cocktail spoon

ingredients:

2 oz Prichard's Single Malt Whiskey
.5 oz Luxardo Marchino Liqueur
.5 oz Eli Mason Gomme Syrup
.25 oz fresh lemon juice
garnish with strip of lemon zest

method:

Chill your glass with some ice and get started making the drink by cracking a few cubes into your mixing glass. The increased surface area of cracked ice will help mellow and blend the flavors. Pour all the booze, gomme syrup and lemon juice into the mixing glass and stir for 30-45 seconds. Note: if you shake this drink it will be significantly less boozy, but we like the booze so we stir. Discard ice from glass, strain the drink into the glass and express the lemon peel into the glass and serve. Enjoy responsibly folks.