Queztal

Tiki. Rum. Punch. Maple Syrup. These all go together, right? Right. We know the whole maple syrup thing sounds weird, and we weren't sure about it ourselves at first, but once we tried it we were hooked. Almost any cocktail is going to have some sort of sweet component to it. This is usually simple syrup, occasionally with a flavor included, but almost always made with basic white sugar. Don't get us wrong, we are big fans and users of simple syrup, but why not mix it up a little bit? 

To avoid any confusion, we are talking about real, pure maple syrup. If you use something in a plastic or woman-shaped bottle you're drink won't be right, as that is corn syrup, which is completely different. Real maple syrup will have a slightly thinner texture and a more subtle flavor than it's processed counterpart.

Enough about syrup, let's talk rum punch! While perfectly drinkable all summer long, this recipe will keep your tiki dreams alive well into the fall. The recipe below is for one drink, but is easily translated into a party punch that will serve many

Equipment

Cocktail shaker

Ingredients

1.5 oz Pyrat Rum
.5 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz orange juice
.5 oz pineapple juice
1 oz maple syrup
2 dashes bitters

Method

Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake until well mixed and strain into a glass with fresh ice.

Painkiller

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

One of the newest members of the tiki family, the Painkiller was originally invented at the Soggy Dollar Bar in the British Virgin Islands. Quickly rising in popularity, this cocktail is one of the few tiki drinks to actually incorporate coconut, giving it that real toes-in-the-sand beachiness that you might not find in it's more metropolitan cousins.

An important aspect of the painkiller is the rum used to make it. A Navy-Strength rum is imperative to the original recipe. Navy-Strength rum is generally bottled at cask strength, or at a higher proof than most rums. The name comes from British sailors who, while conquering and pillaging the Caribbean, were given a daily allotment of rum. The sailors tested the rum to see if it had been watered down by lighting it on fire and seeing if it would burn. This was the proof they needed and is also the origin of the term proof in relation to alcohol. 

Equipment:

Cocktail shaker

Ingredients:

2 oz Navy-Strength Dark Rum (Pusser's or Smith & Cross)
.75 oz pineapple juice
.75 oz orange juice
.5 oz cream of coconut
freshly grated nutmeg
pineapple leaf for garnish

Method:

In cocktail shaker with ice, combine rum, pineapple juice, orange juice, and cream of coconut. Shake vigorously and strain into glass filled with fresh ice. Top with nutmeg and garnish with pineapple leaf.

Floridita

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

You've heard of a daiquiri. You've heard of Ernest Hemmingway (we hope). And you might know that those two things go together like Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Used to be, when we thought of a daiquiri, it was of the strawberry variety; bright red and fresh out of the island oasis machine, possibly topped with canned whipped cream. How misinformed we were! The original daiquiris of Hemmingway's day were simple concoctions of rum, sugar, and lime with crushed ice. Papa Doblo (Daddy Double), as he was known to the bartenders in Cuba, earned his name by ordering two drinks at a time. Sometimes referred to as Daiquiri #2, the Floridita stays true to it's roots, embellished only with a little bit of Luxardo and grapefruit juice.

When it comes to frozen or blended drinks, ice becomes a measurable ingredient. You don't want to use too much or too little, otherwise the proportions of booze will be off, and we certainly don't want that! We consulted a bartender friend of ours on the matter and he gave us a great tip on measuring the perfect amount of ice. Simply fill the glass you plan on serving your drink in with ice, and dump that right into your blender. The liquid will fill in the gaps. This recipe makes one drink but is easy to multiply, just measure your ice accordingly.

Equipment:

Blender
Bar spoon

Ingredients:

2 oz Flor de Cana White Rum
.75 oz fresh lime juice
.5 oz Luxardo
.5 oz grapefruit juice
granulated sugar
maraschino cherry for garnish

Method:

Combine two bar spoons of sugar, rum, lime juice, Luxardo, and grapefruit juice in blender with (measured) ice. Blend until smooth and garnish with a cherry. Ideally the drink will be thick enough for the cherry to rest on top with out sinking. Thats how you know you used the right amount of ice.

Scorpion Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Ben Clemons

Now this is our idea of a drink! We've all had the ubiquitous Long Island Iced Tea before, (Just admit it. Its ok you were young...) and we have the Scorpion Bowl to thank. While most Tiki drinks were actually invented by a handful of guys in the United States, the Bowl is based on the idea of "communal drinks," which was a part of South Sea drinking custom. The Polynesians knew there was nothing quite like sharing a giant bowl of booze with their friends!

For this drink, you will need the vessel known as a scorpion bowl or tiki bowl. These are available in a range of options and prices. Other than buying online, you will probably have to keep your eyes peeled at flea markets or antique stores to find one. If you do find one grab it! They aren't all that common in the wild, but otherwise easy to buy with your trusty computer. Traditionally decorated with demons to guard your drink, they can also be found covered with palm trees, hula girls, and other South Pacific imagery. Another feature might be a volcano in the center of the bowl. Trust us, get the one with the volcano if you can, the added theatrics are well worth it. 

The easy association to make is between tiki drinks and rum, but actually a wide range of spirits are used to create these libations. Remember these cocktails were invented by Americans who had access to all sorts of ingredients. That is why you will find things like gin, cognac, sherry, and curaçao included. Our Scorpion Bowl recipe is actually quite easy to make, so invite a few friends and lets get started.

Equipment:

Scorpion Bowl

Ingredients:

3oz london dry gin
3 oz light rum
3 oz brandy
3 oz fresh orange juice
1.5 oz orgeat syrup
1.5 oz fresh lemon juice
1.5 oz amontillado sherry

for the volcano:
2 oz 151-proof rum
ground cinnamon

Method:

Fill Scorpion Bowl with ice. Add gin, rum, brandy, orange juice, orgeat, lemon juice, and sherry to bowl and stir to combine. Fill volcano with 151 rum and carefully set on fire before serving. Toss pinches of cinnamon into fire to create a crackling, fireworks effect.

Serves 2-4 people

El Presidente

People think of classic cocktails and assume they're to be made with gin - or maybe even whiskey or bourbon. But there's some great drinks out there made with rum.

Like anything in life, a cocktail is only as good as the ingredients you put into it. For this one, we're using one of our favorite rums, Caña Brava. Made with wild sugar cane molasses from Panama, it's distilled in a 1922 copper and brass still and has the perfect rum flavor that makes and outstanding foundation for cocktails. 

The other key ingredients in this are a really good orange curaçao (we like Pierre Ferrand) and homemade (or at least good quality) grenadine. If you use that nasty bright red stuff, this drink will simply not be the same.  

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Caña Brava Rum
1.25 oz Dry Vermouth
0.75 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao
0.5 oz good quality grenadine (like Eli Mason)
1 orange twist, for garnish

method:

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass. Add large, cold ice. Stir until very cold, strain and serve up in a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

Key Lime Mojito

Mojitos. They're the bane of every bartender's existence. As soon as one gets ordered, everyone wants one. All that damn muddlin' and prep. 

But people order them for a reason. Because they're fucking delicious. Fresh mint, lime, sugar, rum and seltzer combine to make one hell of a tasty cocktail. 

We've got a bottle of the Wray & Nephew Overproof White Rum and were wondering what to do to a mojito that would make it stand up the intense flavor of really good rum. The answer was simple, swap out regular limes for key limes

Valued for their tart and bitter flavor, key limes have more acidity (and seeds) than regular limes. They're easy to find fresh in about any grocery store, so please don't cop out with bottled juice, okay?

 

equipment:

muddler
cocktail shaker
bar spoon
tall glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Wray & Nephew Overproof White Rum
2 whole fresh key limes
2 sprigs fresh mint (about 12 leaves)
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
5-6 oz seltzer
fresh mint and lime for garnish


method:

Cut the fresh limes into quarters and drop them into the bottom of your cocktail shaker. Add the fresh mint and sugar and muddle to press and release the juices from the lime and the flavor of the mint. Add the rum and stir with a bar spoon to finish dissolving the sugar. Add a few cubes of ice and give it a quick shake before transferring to your glass. Rinse the shaker with the seltzer and pour into glass. Give it a light stir and fill with more ice if needed. 

The Wreck

Mmmm, rum

Do you ever feel like rum does not get the attention it deserves? We do. Don't get us wrong, we love whiskey and tequila and gin....well, everything, but rum often seems to be left out when people talk about serious cocktails. 

Obviously, they have not had Pyrat Rum. Coming from the folks behind Patrón, you know it has to be good. And it is. So good in fact, you can drink it right from the bottle. Yeah, we tried.

So while you could (and should) try drinking Pyrat on the rocks, we figured it's getting warm so why not do something a little more refreshing?

Here you go...

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Pyrat Rum
1.5 oz fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice
.25 oz simple syrup
lime wedge


method:

Add the rum, juice and simple syrup to a cocktail shaker. Fill it with ice and give it a real quick, light shake (not so much to water it down) before dumping the entire thing into a chilled rocks glass. Squeeze a wedge of lime on top and you're good to go!

Jasper's Rum Punch

If you were partying with us last October, you know we love a good Tiki drink. So much so that we declared it Tikitober and had an event with nothing but tropical drinks. As good as that event was, we were only really missing one thing. Jamaican Overproof Rum

Called "overproof" for good reason, it's a ingredient in quite a few classic Tiki cocktails and packs one hell of a punch in the buzz department. Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum comes in at 63% alcohol - 126 proof! 

Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum is a top selling high-strength white rum. A legend in Jamaica, this is the real rum from the island where the rum comes from. It adds a unique rum character to drinks and is the essential ingredient in authentic Jamaican rum punch, made famous by Jasper LeFranc, the former head bartender of the Bay Roc Hotel in Montego Bay. 

This recipe below is best made in large batches, since it requires a little prep for Jasper's special mixer. Recipe adapted from Beachbum Berry's Potions of the Caribbean - an essential book for anyone that loves great Tiki drinks!

 

equipment:

tall cocktail glass
sizzle stick

ingredients:

1.5 oz Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum
1.5 oz Jasper's basic stock mix
crushed ice
slice of lime, cherry and mint sprig for garnish


method:

Fill your glass halfway with crushed ice and add rum and mixer. Swizzle it around until well chilled. Fill the remaining area with more crushed ice, swizzle again and garnish.


Jasper's Basic Stock Mix

Mix one cup of freshly-squeezed lime juice with 3/4 cup of granulated sugar. Stir until it dissolves and add 1/2 ounce of Angostura bitters and a heaping 1/2 teaspoon of freshly-grated nutmeg. Transfer to a bottle and refrigerate until using, shaking before each use.

The Jala-Piña

With a SOLD OUT May 3st of the Month only a few weeks away, it's time to start getting fresh with some of the participants. That means more recipes!

This sweet and spicy drink is made with one of the 20+ brands that will be in attendance, Captain Morgan Rums. They just recently released a trio of flavored white rums in grapefruit, coconut and pineapple. Needless to say, we had to get our hands on some to taste for ourselves! The flavor is fresh and natural, without too much sweetness. 

To get started, we reached for Captain Morgan Pineapple. This stuff is insanely versatile and is begging to be made into some poolside summertime cocktails, so we set out to do just that. Pairing it with fresh jalapeño peppers, lime and a little pineapple juice was a perfect combo. One thing to keep in mind when working jalapeños into a cocktail: strain it, strain it good. This way you get the flavor without too much heat. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2-4 slices fresh jalapeño pepper (depending on heat preference)
1/2 fresh lime, cut into pieces
2 oz Captain Morgan Pineapple Rum
2 oz pineapple juice


method:

Place the jalapeño slices and pieces of fresh lime in the bottom of a cocktail shaker. Muddle to release juice and flavors. Fill shaker with ice and add remaining ingredients. Cover and shake well to chill before double-straining into a rocks glass with fresh ice. 

Emerald Isle

When it comes time for St Patrick's Day, everyone starts thinking GREEN! Green socks, green shirts, green beer. Admit it, you've tried it...only to wake up in the middle of the night with green vomit. 

But while there are many natural ways to make drinks green, sometimes you just need to resort to the old fashioned way - food coloring. In this case, it's with the addition of two brightly-colored spirits; blue curacao and Midori. Both of these often get a bum rap for being 'foo-foo' drink ingredients, but when used in moderation, you can get two great things from them - flavor and color. Especially when you put a ton of rum with them.

In this case, we're using two of our favorite rums from our Tikitober event last October, both from Papa's Pilar. Like with many Tiki Drinks, we're using more than one rum, getting signature flavors from each. 

This drink is not as sweet as it looks and it packs one hell of a punch, with a total of 3.5 oz of booze. So please go easy on them. We wouldn't want you waking up in the middle of the night with green vomit or anything. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
jigger
strainer
tiki glass or tumbler

ingredients:

2 oz Papa's Pilar Light Rum
.5 oz Papa's Pilar Dark Rum
.5 oz Licor 43
.5 oz Midori
.5 oz blue curacao
1.5 oz fresh-squeezed oj
.5 oz fresh lime juice
slice of orange and lime for garnish


method:

Combine everything except your garnish in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 15 seconds to chill. Strain into your glass and fill the glass with crushed ice. Garnish and serve. 

Lower East Side

Second to an Old Fashioned, the Manhattan might just be the most well-known classic cocktail. Essentially an Old Fashioned with a little sweet vermouth in place of the sugar cube, it still contains the quintessential classic cocktail ingredient: bitters.

We recently got our hands on a bottle of Black Magic Spiced Rum and immediately started playing around with using it in cocktails. It's deep, dark spiced flavor makes it a natural for mixing and the first one out of the gate was this rum-based version of a Manhattan - what we're calling the Lower East Side.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Black Magic Spiced Rum
1 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters


method:

Add the rum, vermouth and bitters to your cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice and serve. If so inclined, garnish with a cherry to two.

Coconut Sake Cocktail

To say there's a ton of different types of sake is a massive understatement. Besides the typical differences, there's now flavored sakes that add even more variety to the mix.

Ty Ku Coconut Sake is a nigiri sake. Nigiri sakes are known for their cloudy appearance, where a small amount of rice content remains, giving a silky texture and mouthfeel. The flavor is subtle and not too sweet, but the tropical taste reminded us of warmer days during these winter months, so we figured we'd go with that inspiration on this tiki-like drink.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
collins glass

ingredients:

2 oz Ty Ku Coconut Sake
1 oz Sugar Island Coconut Rum
.5 oz blue curacao
1 oz fresh lemon juice
splash of soda
lice of lemon for garnish

 

method:

Combine sake, rum, lemon juice and blue curacao in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into collins glass with ice. Top with seltzer and garnish with slice of lemon.

 


Big Bamboo

If ever there were an example of what a mix of fresh fruit juices can do for a Tiki Drink, the Big Bamboo is the one. With fresh-squeezed lime, orange, and grapefruit juices - plus a little passionfruit syrup, each simple flavor layers with the next to make this classic from 1960 a true Tiki Drink.

Originally from Mariano Licudine of the Mai-Kai in Fort Lauderdale, Florida this cocktail eventually became known as the "Mara-Amu." Some suggest they changed the name when they lowered the booze content, which was probably not a bad thing.

Like many other classics, this cocktail gets a quick zip in the blender, but if you prefer to leave the appliances out of the mix, just shake the shit out of it - but go with crushed ice, as you'll need every drop of water you can get to soften the punch of the rum.

Speaking of rum, we chose to use Flor de Caña Anejo Oro for the primary spirit in this one. This gold rum is aged 4 years and proves to be that perfect balance of soft yet full. Better still, you can try it next Friday, October 3rd when we gather for "Tikitober" at Track One!

Recipe adapted from Beachbum Berry's Sippin' Safari.

 

equipment:

blender
tall glass

ingredients:

1 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz fresh orange juice
1 oz fresh white grapefruit juice
1 oz passionfruit syrup (recipe)
1 oz dark Jamaican rum
2 oz Flor de Caña Anejo Oro
4 dashes Angostura bitters
1 cup crushed ice


method:

Add all ingredients to a blender and blend on high for 5 seconds. Pour into glass and serve.

Pyrat Rum Cow

Who said Tiki Drinks are only for evenings? Kinda like the New Orleans morning tradition Brandy Milk Punch, this 1937 original from Don the Beachcomber takes a simple combination of rum, milk, sugar and spice and serves it up for any time of the day...or morning.

While the original recipe calls for dark Jamaican rum, we've swapped it out with one of our favorites, Pyrat XO Reserve. From the makers of Patron (YUM!), Pyrat Rum is a blend of exceptional barrel-aged "pot still" rums . Unlike column distillation, pot stills leave more esters (i.e. flavor) in the rum. Once selected and blended (including rums aged up to 15 years), they are further mellowed in French Limousin and toasted American Oak barrels, imparting even more complexity to the spirit. Lucky us.

We also tweaked the original recipe by swapping out simple syrup with Turbinado Simple Syrup (recipe here) and adding a little cream to the mix because, after all, who doesn't love cream? The real secret? Freshly-grated nutmeg. Forget that shit sitting in the tin can hiding in the back of your spice cabinet. Go with the fresh stuff.

Recipe adapted from Beachbum Berry's Sippin' Safari.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz Pyrat XO Reserve
1 oz Turbinado simple syrup
2 oz milk
1 oz cream
freshly-grated nutmeg


method:

Fill cocktail shaker with ice and add rum, turbinado simple syrup, milk and cream. Cover and shake well for 15 seconds or so. Strain into a chilled glass and grate some of that nutmeg on top. Now go get your morning paper and chill.


Tiki Takedown

An artist friend recently told us the story about a buddy who would get drunk on Tiki Drinks and set up a makeshift bowling alley in the back yard. He used a series of Tiki heads as the pins and called it Tiki Takedown. 

It sounded like fun to us, but we don't have any Tiki heads. Oh well, apparently we'll just have to get drunk and not worry about the game.

We made this with some fine-ass rum that will be at our October 3st of the Month - Papa's Pilar Rums. These rums are aged and blended in what's called the Solera process. They are aged in bourbon and port wine barrels before being blended and finished in sherry casks. The result? Fine ass rum. Didn't we already tell you that?!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
bar spoon
crushed ice
tall glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Papa's Pilar 3 Blonde Rum
1.5 oz Papa's Pilar 24 Dark Rum
1 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
1 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
1 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
.5 oz cinnamon syrup
1 barspoon orange flower water
3 dashes bitters
fresh lime and flower garnish

 

method:

Fill serving glass with crushed ice. In your cocktail shaker, add all ingredients except bitters and garnish. Shake vigorously for 15-20 seconds and strain into serving glass. Add bitters on top, garnish and serve.

Fogg Cutter

Don't let the frilly umbrella on this drink fool you - it's not for the weak of heart, or liver for that matter.

Made with 4 ounces of booze, including two different rums, gin and brandy, it actually tastes surprisingly approachable, due in part to the addition of pure almond extract. 

Created in the 1970's at New Orlean's Bali Hai At The Beach, it was misspelled with an extra "g" on fog - most likely to differentiate it from the original Trader Vic's version. Well, that or whoever named it had consumed one to many themselves!

 

Recipe adapted from Beachbum Berry Remixed: A Gallery of Tiki Drinks.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
tiki mug

ingredients:

2 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
1.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
1.5 oz turbinado simple syrup (recipe)
1 oz Ron Matusalem light rum
1 oz Ron Matusalem dark rum
1 oz brandy
1 oz gin
1 bar spoon almond extract
8 oz crushed ice
fresh mint for garnish

 

method:

Combine everything in a blender and blend on high speed for 5 seconds before pouring into glass and adding more crushed ice to fill. Garnish and serve.

Bali-Bali

As you likely know, tiki drinks have quite a history. While we won't get into all the details now, we will make this old-ass drink. Well, it's not that old...just from the 1950's. Okay, so maybe it is kinda old.

Originally from Bali Ha'i At The Beach in New Orleans, it's a great example of just how misleading a good tiki drink can be. All those cute and frilly garnishes make some folks think they're drinking a "fu-fu" drink meant for the ladies.

We have news for you - this drink is no fu-fu drink. It's packed with booze.

Like with all of our cocktails, we urge you to please drink responsibly. Especially when you have 4 ounces of booze in one cocktail!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
highball glass

ingredients:

1 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
1 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice
1 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
1 oz dark Jamaican rum (such as Myers)
1 oz light Virgin Islands rum
1 oz gin
1 oz Cognac
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz Velvet Falernum
.5 oz passion fruit syrup (see our recipe here)
fresh fruit garnish

 

method:

Combine all ingredients with ice and shake well. Transfer unstrained into your glass and fill with additional ice if needed. Garnish and serve.

Mai Tea Cocktail

You know how we Southerners are. . . we put Duke's Mayo on everything, love some good fried food and just have to drink our sweet tea. With Tikitober just around the corner, we're embracing all kinds of Tiki drinks, but thought it might be fun to give this one a Southern spin.

The classic Mai Tai has a history that dates back to the 30's or 40's. Depending on who you ask, some say it was invented at Trader Vic's in the mid 40's, others claim that Don the Beachcomber was making a more complex version in the early 30's. Regardless of who made it, it's a classic Tiki staple made with rum (typically a blend of rums), fresh citrus juice and unique spice flavors coming from Falernum (see our previous post about it here), Orgeat syrup (see more about this here) and orange curaçao. 

We took that classic version and added a little Southern accent with some sweet tea moonshine from American Born. Oh yes we did.

Oh, and one more thing. Be careful with this one. It's almost entirely booze.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
highball glass
crushed ice

ingredients:

1 oz black rum
1 oz spiced rum
1 oz white rum
.5 oz Velvet Falernum
.5 oz orgeat syrup
.5 oz orange curaçao 
.5 oz American Born Sweet Tea Moonshine
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
pineapple and cherry for garnish


method:

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill and strain into your glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish, kick back and enjoy...y'all.

Corn n' Oil

Everyone loves a classic. Especially a classic cocktail. The tiki-like Corn n' Oil cocktail has a history that goes back for generations, yet still seems hazy, as there are many arguments over the origin and exact recipe.

Frankly, we don't really give a shit where it comes from, 'cause this damn drink is delicious! The odd name likely comes from the look of dark rum floating on top of the clear Falernum. We've used Falernum before, but it's worth another mention.

Originating from the Barbados, Falernum can either be a syrup or, in this case, a low-proof liqueur. Regardless if it's got booze or not, one thing is for sure - it is packed with flavors of lime, clove and almond. Now, of course there's some disagreement in this area too, as some recipes also add ginger, but you get the point. This shit is delicious and you should have some in your liquor cabinet.

 

equipment:

rocks glass
crushed ice

ingredients:

2 oz Velvet Falernum
1.75 oz blackstrap rum
2 dashes Angostura bitters
2 wedges fresh lime

method:

Fill your glass with crushed ice. Pour falernum directly into the glass and float the rum on top. Add bitters and squeeze lime wedges into cocktail. Serve and mix quickly before drinking.

 


Grapefruit Hammock Tiki Drink

We've recently announced that our October 3st of the Month theme will be all about Tiki Drinks. We're kinda obsessed with them actually. . .but we're also excited about educating some folks about what Tiki Drinks are all about. 

As we've discussed before, a good Tiki Drink is all about complexity and layers of flavors. They typically start with fresh fruit juices and a combination of rums, but it's the other elements that really make them 'tiki' - the spices, syrups and flavors. 

But it's a common misconception that they have to be sickeningly sweet. In order to set that straight, we've whipped up this grapefruit-based cocktail, using original 'white' grapefruit, not the candy-sweet ruby red variety (thought they will work as well).

But we've also added another fundamental of many Tiki Drinks - Falernum. Falernum is available as a liqueur or flavored syrup and refers to a combination of lime, ginger, spice and almond flavors. It's a key ingredient in the classic Zombie cocktail and adds immediate complexity to cocktails. 

 

The Grapefruit Hammock - a refreshingly tart Tiki Drink from 3st of the Month

equipment:

cocktail shaker
strainer
tiki glass or collins glass

ingredients:

3 oz fresh-squeezed white grapefruit juice
.75 oz aged white rum
.75 oz black rum
.75 oz spiced rum
.75 oz falernum
.5 oz apricot liqueur
pinch freshly-grated nutmeg
fresh grapefruit and cherry for garnish


method:

Combine all ingredients except garnish in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake for 15 seconds to chill. Fill glass with ice and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish and serve.