Black Night

If ever there were proof that you can have fun with your cocktails and still make them themed, this one is it! 

Made with Virgil Kaine Ginger-Infused Bourbon, we've darkened things up with muddled fresh blackberries, a little black currant liqueur and a touch of sweet vermouth. The spice of the ginger pairs perfectly with the fruit flavors - and it's all rounded out with the addition of sweet vermouth. Seriously, if you don't believe us, try it without the vermouth and you'll see what a difference one ingredient can make!

But the real key to this cocktail is double-straining. Nobody wants a bunch of damn seeds in their cocktails, so do it right and strain this cocktail. 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
strainer
fine mesh strainer
cocktail or coupe glass

ingredients:

5 fresh blackberries (plus more for garnish)
2 oz Virgil Kaine Ginger Infused Bourbon
.5 oz Creme de Cassis liqueur (or dark blackberry liqueur)
.5 oz sweet vermouth

method:

Muddle blackberries in your cocktail shaker before adding remaining ingredients and filling with ice. Shake vigorously and double-strain into a chilled glass. Garnish with a couple blackberries and serve.

Manhattan to Newport

When the good folks at Knob Creek sent us a bottle of their small batch rye whiskey, we thought; "Gee, this stuff sure is good all by itself in a glass!" Alas, we are an organization that strives to bring you all the best in cocktails, so we got started mixing. A good rye doesn't need much to make it sing, so rather than muck it up with a bunch of juice and syrup, we kept it simple with a slightly minty take on an old classic.

We see hiptsers wincing down shot after shot of Fernet Branca alongside cans of PBR in what we can only assume is an attempt to be the coolest member of a hats and suspenders club? As much as we love Fernet, a little can go a long way, and its deep, complex flavors are sometimes best served in a supporting role to whiskey's leading man. 

Equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
chilled martini glass

Ingredients:

2 oz Knob Creek Rye Whiskey
.5 oz Fernet Branca
.5  oz sweet vermouth

Method:

Shake all ingredients in cocktail shaker until shaker is frosty and strain into prepared glass. Do not garnish with a maraschino cherry as that will ruin the drink.

Cool Story, Bros.

Bartenders hear some of the most incredible stories. And perhaps few of the most lame stories. But the good bartenders will always pretend like it's a good one, regardless of how shitty the story may be. 

Some of the best booze also has great stories. Take Medley Bros. Bourbon, for instance. All you have to do is take one look at the label to know there's got to be a good story behind it. It is from Charles Medley and his son, Sam, who have been producing Wathen's Single Barrel for about 15 years now. Charles is the son of Wathen Medley, who is second from the right of the five brothers pictured on the label. 

Bottled at 102 proof, it's got some bite to the booze and is great for making cocktails, so we worked it into a cocktail that could lower the overall proof, yet showcase the flavors it got from aging 4 years in a barrel. 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
coupe or cocktail glass

Ingredients:

.75 oz Medley Brothers Bourbon
.75 oz Dolin Rouge Sweet Vermouth
.75 oz Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao
.25 oz Brandy
4 dashes Angostura Bitters
2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters
strip of orange zest for garnish

method:

Combine all ingredients (except the garnish of course) in a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into your chilled glass. express the oils from the peel into the cocktail and place on the rim to garnish. 

Midnight Negroni

We've said it before, but Port just doesn't seem to get enough love when it comes to cocktails. To be called a Port (or sometimes Vinho do Porto), it must be produced in Portugal. Other wine produced in the style of port are available, but we choose to go with the real thing. 

It's a fortified wine, meaning the wine has had other alcohol added to it. In Portugal, they do this by adding a grape distillate called aguardente (similar to brandy) to the wine, which stops the fermentation by killing the yeast, leaving more residual sugars in the wine. Regardless of how it's made, even just a little Port can enhance a cocktail like this one. 

But we suggest using Port wisely. It's very flavorful and can overwhelm a cocktail if you use too much or pair it with subtle spirits. So we're reaching for a great (local!) gin, Abernathy Gin from TennSouth. It's a New American style, but still has enough botanical flavor to work perfectly in this cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Abernathy Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1 oz sweet vermouth
.5 oz Port (any kind will do)
strip of orange zest for garnish


method:

Add all spirits to a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir until fully chilled and strain into a chilled rocks glass with fresh ice. Garnish with orange peel.

Smoky Negroni

One of the reasons we love the Negroni is the sheer versatility of the cocktail. Simply by swapping out London Dry Gin for a New American Gin or Genever, you have a different cocktail. 

But this version takes it even further. 

We've thrown 'tradition' out the window by scrapping gin altogether in favor of Mezcal. Though some might say Mezcal is an acquired taste, it didn't take us very long to love it. It's a cousin of tequila with a smoky taste almost reminiscent of Scotch. Appearing more and more in many cocktails, its bold flavor makes it a natural for the bitterness of a Negroni.

But we didn't stop at Mezcal. We've also swapped out a bit of the Campari with Ancho Reyes. Made in small batches and infused with dried ancho chilis, Ancho Reyes is one of those things you should probably own, as even just a little can do magic to most any cocktail.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon 
strainer

ingredients:

1.5 oz Vida Mezcal from Del Maguey
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
1 oz Campari
.5 oz Ancho Reyes
orange twist for garnish


method:

Combine all spirits in a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into a chilled rocks glass with fresh ice. Add twist of orange to garnish.

Nashgroni

Hopefully by now you're clued into the fact that we make cocktails with shit we like. Be it a classic booze or something small and new to the market, we love turning you on to the stuff you should be drinking.

So, listen up: here's two things you should be drinking in one. A Negroni and Corsair's Barrel Aged Gin.

We could go on and on (and we have) about how much we love a good Negroni. One of the many reasons we love this drink is how easily you can alter it with the substitution of ingredients. In the case of this cocktail, we've held back the Campari and reached instead for Cynar. Owned by Campari, Cynar is an artichoke-based amaro from Italy. Compared to Campari, the flavor is softer, fuller and rounder than its bright red cousin. 

The other key to this being a NASHgroni is the gin. Hailing from hometown hero Corsair Distillery, this barrel aged gin is unlike any other gin on the market. Though there are certainly other delicious gins that are aged in barrels, we know of no other that ages them in spiced rum barrels. This step gives their already delicious rum a level of additional spice and sweetness that pairs perfectly with Cynar in this cocktail. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Corsair Barrel Aged Gin
1.5 oz Cynar
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
strip of orange zest for garnish 


method:

Super simple - just add the booze to a cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain it into a rocks glass with fresh ice and garnish with orange zest. 

Orange Negroni

Gin is made for cocktails. 

You can shoot tequila straight, sip frozen vodka at dessert and drink whiskey on the rocks, but gin is made for cocktails. 

We were quickly reminded of that fact when we tasted Damrak Gin for the first time. With a flavor unlike any gin we've ever tasted (and we've tasted a shit load of gin), Damrak turns down the juniper and turns up the citrus. Orange, to be exact. It's a mandatory 'must' for any gin lover - or even a gin hater for that matter, cause this stuff will turn them. But we shouldn't be surprised that it's so good. It comes from Bols - the same folks that make Bols Genever. They've been making spirits since 1575, so it's pretty safe to say they know their shit.

To play up the natural orange flavor of Damrak, we've added just a couple dashes of orange bitters to the classic Negroni recipe. Try it. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Damrak Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters
twist of orange peel for garnish.


method:

Combine the spirits and bitters in your mixing glass. Fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a pre-chilled rocks glass and add fresh ice. Garnish by expressing the oils of the orange zest into the cocktail before dropping it into the glass.

Bijou

Here's one to file away for the 'random useless knowledge' category should you ever be on Jeopardy. 

Another classic gin cocktail, the Bijou translates to jewel in French. Why you ask? Because it combines three spirits, each representing a different jewel - gin for diamond, vermouth for ruby and Chartreuse for emerald. Pretty cool, huh?

The drink dates way back to the 1880s when it was first mentioned in Harry Johnson’s 1882 Bartender’s Manual. It's another example of how sweet vermouth and gin go hand-in-hand but it's a intensely-flavored cocktail, thanks in part to the addition of the Chartreuse.

For this one, we've grabbed our bottle of Abernathy Gin. Made here in TN, it's made using a vapor infusion technique and a special blend of nine botanicals including juniper, coriander, cassia, citrus peels and pecans to create a New American craft gin, with less intense flavor than the traditional London Dry Gins.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

1 oz Abernathy Gin
1 oz sweet vermouth
1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 dash orange bitters
strip of orange zest to garnish


method:

Start by chilling your cocktail glass. Add the booze and bitters to your mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into your glass and garnish with orange zest.

Negroni

As we've stated before, we're pretty happy that Juniper June just happens to fall smack dab in the middle of Negroni Week. This celebration of the classic cocktail takes place in bars across the world, each offering a portion of the sales of every Negroni cocktail to the charity of their choice. 

Though the true origin of the classic Negroni is unknown, many think that it was first served at a cafe in Florence Italy in 1919. The story goes that a customer asked to 'stiffen' an Americano (vermouth, Campari and soda water) but using gin in place of the soda. The fad caught on and the Negroni family of Italy started producing a ready-made version of the cocktail, Antico Negroni.

Regardless of the history, the Negroni is the definition of balance, with the bitterness of the Campari, the sweetness of the vermouth and the boozyness of the gin in perfect harmony.

And while you're welcome to make a Negroni with any gin you wish, we've become kinda partial to Bulldog Gin from London. It's a London Dry Gin with spin - adding a few surprise botanicals in addition to the juniper and coriander that are commonplace among gins. Most notably, this includes lavender, lotus leaves and 'dragon eye,' most commonly known as longan, a relative of the lychee fruit.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
rocks glass
ice ball maker (optional)

ingredients:

1.5 oz Bulldog Gin
1.5 oz Campari
1.5 oz sweet vermouth
strip of orange zest for garnish


method:

Add the Bulldog Gin, Campari and sweet vermouth to a cocktail mixing glass. Add ice and stir to chill. How long? A good gauge is feel the glass as you stir. Once it becomes ice cold, you know the drink is ready. Strain the cocktail into a chilled rocks glass and add an ice sphere or single large ice cube. Express the oils from the orange peel into the cocktail, run the oily side along the rim of the glass and drop it in. 


The Ford Negroni

Instead of the traditional recipe with equal parts gin, sweet vermouth and Campari, this extra-boozy version calls for a heavier hand of gin. Really good gin, in fact.

We're using another one of our favorites from Juniper June, Fords Gin

Fords Gin is distilled in London at Thames Distillers, and is a collaboration between 8th generation Master Distiller Charles Maxwell and Simon Ford of The 86 Co. The mix of 9 botanicals starts with a traditional backbone base of juniper & coriander seed that's balanced with citrus (bitter orange, lemon & grapefruit peels), floral (jasmine flower & orris) and spice (angelica & cassia). The botanicals are steeped for 15 hours before distillation in 500 liter stills. The result is a gin custom-made for mixing into cocktails. 

So let's go ahead and make this one!

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Fords Gin
1 oz Campari
1 oz Carpano Antica (sweet vermouth)
dash of grapefruit bitters
lemon peel for garnish


method:

Combine Fords Gin, Campari, Carpano Antica and grapefruit bitters in a cocktail mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir to chill and strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice. Garnish with lemon peel.


Bright Negroni

It's pretty convenient that Juniper June falls right in the middle of Negroni Week

One of our all-time favorite classic cocktails, the Negroni, is typically composed of equal parts gin, sweet vermouth and Campari. Negroni Week has raised the profile of this simple cocktail with their annual celebration, encouraging bars around the world to embrace the bitter side of booze and donate a portion of Negroni sales to a charity of their choice. 

What's even more exciting is how this event has expanded the definition of what makes a Negroni. Bartenders are whipping up all kinds of spins on the classic - so we figured we should too!

In this version, we've swapped out Campari for it's slightly sweeter and less bitter cousin Aperol. But that's not all. We also opted for dry vermouth instead of sweet vermouth. And for the gin? We grabbed one of our favorites, Plymouth Gin

Plymouth Gin is a unique, protected style of gin originating from the city of Plymouth, South West England. Since 1793 it has been distilled from a unique blend of 7 botanicals, soft Dartmoor water and pure grain alcohol at the historic Black Friars Distillery - the oldest working distillery in England. See if you can find another brand of gin that's so good it has its own class of gin!

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Plymouth Gin
1.5 oz Aperol
1.5 oz dry vermouth


method:

Like the classic Negroni, this cocktail just needs to be stirred with ice. So add the ingredients to your mixing glass, fill with ice and stir until it's cool. Strain into a glass with fresh ice and garnish.

Big Gin Martini

At the risk of pissing off some purists, we're going to go ahead and say it. A martini should be made with GIN.

Not only should it be made with gin, you should actually put a good bit of vermouth in there. That's right, none of this 'vermouth atomizer' bullshit. Pour it in.

The final myth we need to dispel (thanks to good ol' 007) is that a martini should always be stirred. Shaking it will only further water it down, losing the flavor of the gin. Speaking of flavorful gin...

Distilled and bottled in Seattle, Washington, Big Gin is a gin-lover's gin. Packed with botanicals, it sings with both the flavors of Traditional English gin (juniper, coriander, bitter orange) and modern flavor notes from Tasmanian pepperberry and grains of paradise, the peppery seeds of a member of the ginger family. So, in order to play off the existing flavors of this great gin, we added just a touch of lemon bitters. 

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
barspoon
strainer
martini glass

ingredients:

3 oz Big Gin
1.5 oz dry vermouth
1 dash lemon bitters
lemon twist for garnish

method:

Start by chilling your glass by placing it in the freezer or filling with crushed ice. Add the gin, vermouth and bitters to a cocktail mixing glass. Add ice and stir to chill for about 15-20 seconds. Strain into your chilled martini glass and garnish with the lemon twist.


Lower East Side

Second to an Old Fashioned, the Manhattan might just be the most well-known classic cocktail. Essentially an Old Fashioned with a little sweet vermouth in place of the sugar cube, it still contains the quintessential classic cocktail ingredient: bitters.

We recently got our hands on a bottle of Black Magic Spiced Rum and immediately started playing around with using it in cocktails. It's deep, dark spiced flavor makes it a natural for mixing and the first one out of the gate was this rum-based version of a Manhattan - what we're calling the Lower East Side.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Black Magic Spiced Rum
1 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters


method:

Add the rum, vermouth and bitters to your cocktail mixing glass, fill with ice and stir to chill. Strain into a rocks glass with fresh ice and serve. If so inclined, garnish with a cherry to two.

That One Drunk Uncle

We all have one. C'mon, admit it. The face talker...with bad breath? The one that likes to hug the ladies crotch-first. Yeah, him.

Family time can be stressful, but we've whipped up a boozy little number that might just do the trick. Made with JP Wiser's Spiced Rye Whisky, this one turns up the winter spice. Rye naturally has a good touch of spice already, but what these guys have done is also add a hint of vanilla, which makes it quite tasty and very mixable. If you were at our November 3st of the Month, you likely had a shot (or four).

We add even more spice with a little cinnamon syrup (get the recipe here) and perhaps our favorite sweet vermouth of all time, Camparo Antica. This stuff is so good you can sip it neat. Trust us.

 

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
cocktail glass

ingredients:

2 oz JP Wiser's Spiced Rye Whisky
1 oz Camparo Antica
.5 oz cinnamon syrup
2 dashes orange bitters
strip of orange zest


method:

Fill your cocktail mixing glass with ice and add all wet ingredients. Stir for 15-20 seconds to chill and strain into prepared (chilled) cocktail glass. Express oils from the orange peel over cocktail and drop into glass.

Doc Holiday

Our September 3st of the Month was a hit! 300 of Nashville's finest gathered to celebrate Whiskey and Bourbon with some incredible booze and delicious cocktails. 

One table that seemed to have a crowd all night was the table for Old Forester's Doc Holiday cocktail. A creative spin on a classic Boulevardier, with a few special ingredients.

They swapped out the classic Campari with Aperol, which brought the bitterness down just a bit and then added lemon juice and fresh thyme, which added complexity and earthiness to the boozy beverage.

It was such a hit that we asked them to share the recipe, and so they did. Here go you, Old Forester's Doc Holiday. . .

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
cocktail strainer
fine mesh strainer
rocks glass

ingredients:

1 oz Old Forester Signature 100 Proof Whisky
1 oz Aperol
1 oz Sweet Vermouth
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz fresh lemon thyme, roughly chopped
slice of orange for garnish

 

method:

Combine all ingredients (except garnish, of course) over ice in a shaker. Shake to chill and double strain into glass over fresh ice. Garnish with slice of orange.

Cowboy Coffee Cocktail

We admit it. People can get a little obsessed over the ice for their cocktails. The thing is, we actually think it makes a difference. There's the issues of surface area, water quality, etc...all of which impact the taste of your cocktail. 

But as much fuss as folks make over ice, rarely do you see them experimenting with freezing anything other than water for their cocktails. Yeah, this seems obvious, but follow us here. What if you add bitters to your ice? Or freeze lemonade for a bourbon drink? What about black coffee? 

Well, that's exactly what we did here. Using one of our September 3st of the month partners, TINCUP Whiskey from Colorado, we built a boozy cocktail meant for enjoying with black coffee ice cubes. Before you complain, all you have to do is put some coffee in the damn freezer people. It's that simple. Get a tray...fill with chilled (strong) black coffee...and freeze. 

 

Made with TINCUP Whiskey and black coffee ice cubes, the Cowboy Coffee Cocktail is one to try!

equipment:

cocktail mixing glass
bar spoon
strainer
double old fashioned glass

ingredients:

2 oz TINCUP Whiskey
.75 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters
1 barspoon of cherry syrup (from Luxardo Maraschino Cherries)
black coffee ice cubes
orange zest and Luxardo cherry for garnish


method:

In a cocktail mixing glass with ice, stir whiskey, vermouth, bitters and cherry syrup to chill. Place a few black coffee ice cubes in your glass and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with orange zest and cherry.


Garden Pickle Martini

If you're like us, the idea of intentionally enjoying a martini did not settle in until after those infamous college party days. Why would you actually want to taste the booze when you can smother it under layers of sugary juices and sodas and chug it as quickly as possible?

But eventually, we all grow up and realize that a good martini is not only an excuse to really savor good booze, but perhaps also an opportunity to get some veggies into your liquid diet. 

It was a good friend Anita in Charleston, SC who deserves the thanks in this case. The entire door of her refrigerator was full of little jars of pickled veggies - all with one purpose - garnishing a martini. Be it pickled 'dilly beans' or a jar of Tomolives (tasty little pickled green tomatoes), her supply of pickled veggies was matched only by the pickled livers of her guests. 

Speaking of guests...our 3st of the Month members had a chance to taste Prairie Organic Gin for themselves at our August 3st kickoff event. Unlike some gins, the flavors of Prairie are subtle with soft juniper notes. It's the perfect vehicle for a spin on a classic gin martini - aka pickled salad bar - if you ask us. Just be sure you're using dill/sour pickles, not sweet ones. 

 

Garden Pickle Gin Martini recipe from 3st of the Month

equipment:

cocktail shaker
bar spoon
strainer
martini glass

ingredients:

2 oz Prairie Organic Gin
.5 oz dry vermouth
1 bar spoon pickle juice
assorted pickled veggies and olives
sprig of fresh dill (optional)


method:

Start by chilling down your martini glass with ice. You need a good, cold glass for a martini - this is not optional. Then fill your shaker with ice and add the gin, vermouth and bar spoon of pickle juice. Cover and gyrate to chill. You don't want to shake it, as this will water down the flavors. Discard ice from martini glass and strain cocktail into glass. Garnish with assorted pickled veggies and a sprig of dill.


Garden Beet Cocktail

It's hard not to think of the garden this time of year. There's farmer's markets on every corner and neighbors bringing you tomatoes by the dozen. What they should be brining you is a bottle of this Prairie Organic Cucumber Vodka.

Unlike some other flavored vodkas out there there, the flavor of Prairie's Cucumber Vodka is subtle and delicious. It also mixes exceptionally well with a variety of ingredients. (We'd place some bets that it might just make the best Bloody Mary you've ever tried)

And while we know there are some people out there who simply hate beets, we say mind your own damn business and leave this drink for us to have. Because the Garden Beet Cocktail might be on of our favorites yet. With a little sweet mint flavor from Eli Mason's Mint Julep Syrup, a zip of fresh lemon and complexity from dry vermouth, this summertime sipper will convert even the most avid beet hater into a lover.

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
fine mesh strainer
highball glass

ingredients:

1.5 oz Prairie Organic Cucumber Vodka
.5 oz fresh beet juice
.5 oz Eli Mason Mint Julep Cocktail Mixer
.5 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice
.5 oz dry vermouth
1.5 oz seltzer
fresh mint for garnish

 

method:

In a cocktail shaker full of ice, add all ingredients except seltzer. Shake to chill, add seltzer and strain through mesh strainer into glass. Garnish with a sprig of mint and resist the urge to gulp it down... sip, people, sip.

Nuts & Berries

We've talked about Cathead Vodka's Pecan Vodka before - it is one of our favorite southern flavors artfully crafted into a damn tasty vodka. When working on the Blackberry Cobbler cocktail, it was the addition of the black walnut bitters that made us ponder swapping out the whiskey with Pecan Vodka. 

Boy, were were thrilled with the result. The black walnut bitters did some serious magic with the pecan flavors in the vodka, and this thing tasted like something grandma would have baked on a Sunday afternoon. 

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Cathead Pecan Vodka
.25 oz Eli Mason Gomme Syrup
.5 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes black walnut bitters
6 fresh blackberries
strip of orange zest for garnish

 

method:

Start by muddling the blackberries in the cocktail shaker. Add vodka, gomme syrup, sweet vermouth and bitters. Place 4-5 ice cubes in shaker and shake for 30 seconds before transferring entire contents to a chilled rocks glass. Express oil from orange peel over cocktail and drop in the glass for garnish.

Blackberry Cobbler

Back in the late 1880's, the Cobbler was the most popular drink in America. The original was typically made with a base of brandy and enhanced with fresh fruit and sugar. These days, cobbler has a looser definition (as many things do over time), but this version with whiskey, sweet vermouth and blackberries is a notable departure. 

We used a new whiskey we've discovered, Tincup Whiskey from Colorado and it was fantastic! Though it is indeed called a whiskey, it kinda drinks more like a bourbon. That, coupled with some black walnut bitters and Eli Mason gomme syrup made this cocktail pretty damn delicious and slide down nice and easy!

 

equipment:

cocktail shaker
muddler
rocks glass

ingredients:

2 oz Tincup Whiskey
.25 oz Eli Mason Gomme Syrup
.5 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes black walnut bitters
6 fresh blackberries
strip of orange zest for garnish

 

method:

Start by muddling the blackberries in the cocktail shaker. Add whiskey, gomme syrup, sweet vermouth and bitters. Place 4-5 ice cubes in shaker and shake for 30 seconds before transferring entire contents to a chilled rocks glass. Express oil from orange peel over cocktail and drop in the glass for garnish.